MacAndrew

James Johnson MacAndrew

Councillor and local benefactor

James Johnson MacAndrew

James Johnson MacAndrew was born in Liverpool on 21 Sept 1837. He was the third son of Robert MacAndrew. He married his wife Barbara (neé Miller) in 1862 and they lived in Chester.

 

James worked at his father’s firm of fruit merchants and shipowners which imported fresh fruit from the Iberian Peninsula. After leaving the business, James purchased the Lukesland Estate at Harford in 1875. This was reputedly to have been the family home but sadly the couple never had any children.

 

During their time at Lukesland, the MacAndrews almost single-handedly organised the fund-raising campaign for the restoration of Harford Church in 1879. James was also responsible for the building of the first school in the parish near the church for the benefit of the local children; the school did not remain for very long as there was adequate accommodation in Ivybridge.

 

Both James and his wife also gave other substantial gifts to the church for other fixtures and fittings, such as new vestments, oak communion table, sanctuary rails, organ repairs, roof repairs, the restoration of the tower and other projects. A memorial tablet recording their names exists in the church in the chancel.

 

Following the death of Henry Bowen Rivers in 1877, the Stowford Estate was also acquired by James MacAndrew during the following year. As they were living at Lukesland it seems Henry’s sister Augusta was allowed to rent Stowford House and live there until her death in 1882.

 

MacAndrew with the assistance of a team of builders and land agents went on to build 21 houses for letting on 2½ acres of land bordering Exeter Road.

 

For several years James MacAndrew was chairman of the Plympton St. Mary Board of Guardians and Rural Sanitary Authority. When the new Local Government Act came into operation Mr MacAndrew was selected to preside over the Rural District Council. He was also a county J.P. and an Income-tax Commissioner.

 

James MacAndrew died on 22 November 1915 and is buried in St. Petroc’s Churchyard in Harford whilst a stained-glass window in the church records the date of his death.

 

Mr MacAndrew was a well-known conchologist, a collector of mollusc shells. After his death his wife sold his large collection and raised a total of £1,400 for the activities of the Red Cross in Devon.

 

Mr MacAndrew died in 1915 and his widow remained until her death in 1929. The estate passed to Stephen Lee MacAndrew, James‘ heir, a solicitor in London.  At the age of sixty, he seems to have had no wish to move to Devon, and consequently put the combined Lukesland and Stowford Estate on the market. 

 

In 1938, ground known as Lower Abbot’s Field on Exeter Road was donated to the local council for use as a recreation field by the nephew. The only stipulation was that the field had to be kept as an open place and that it be recorded in some suitable way that the field had been dedicated to the public in the memory of the late James MacAndrew of Lukesland. A tall memorial stone was placed in the field which read ‘ Ivybridge Recreation Ground this field has been dedicated to the memory of the late J.J. MacAndrew Esq J.P. of Lukesland’. Much later, in 2015, a specially carved bench in his memory was donated by the Friends of MacAndrews Field (now disbanded) and placed at the top of the field.

 

The recreation field was commandeered shortly afterwards and used as a military base called Uphill camp to house the arriving American troops preparing for D-Day. At the end of the hostilities the local council pressed for the de-requisitioning of the field, but this took a few years before it was eventually handed back. The concrete bases of the nissen huts had to be broken up and removed and a considerable amount of work had to be undertaken to return the field in a suitable condition for recreational sports.

 

MacAndrews Field happily, is still enjoyed as a place for recreation for the local community.
MacAndrew

JAMES JOHNSON MACANDREW

Councillor and local benefactor

James Johnson MacAndrew was born in Liverpool on 21 Sept 1837. He was the third son of Robert MacAndrew. He married his wife Barbara (neé Miller) in 1862 and they lived in Chester.
James worked at his father’s firm of fruit merchants and shipowners which imported fresh fruit from the Iberian Peninsula. After leaving the business, James purchased the Lukesland Estate at Harford in 1875. This was reputedly to have been the family home but sadly the couple never had any children.
During their time at Lukesland, the MacAndrews almost single-handedly organised the fund-raising campaign for the restoration of Harford Church in 1879. James was also responsible for the building of the first school in the parish near the church for the benefit of the local children; the school did not remain for very long as there was adequate accommodation in Ivybridge.
Both James and his wife also gave other substantial gifts to the church for other fixtures and fittings, such as new vestments, oak communion table, sanctuary rails, organ repairs, roof repairs, the restoration of the tower and other projects. A memorial tablet recording their names exists in the church in the chancel.
Following the death of Henry Bowen Rivers in 1877, the Stowford Estate was also acquired by James MacAndrew during the following year. As they were living at Lukesland it seems Henry’s sister Augusta was allowed to rent Stowford House and live there until her death in 1882.
MacAndrew with the assistance of a team of builders and land agents went on to build 21 houses for letting on 2½ acres of land bordering Exeter Road.
For several years James MacAndrew was chairman of the Plympton St. Mary Board of Guardians and Rural Sanitary Authority. When the new Local Government Act came into operation Mr MacAndrew was selected to preside over the Rural District Council. He was also a county J.P. and an Income-tax Commissioner.
James MacAndrew died on 22 November 1915 and is buried in St. Petroc’s Churchyard in Harford whilst a stained-glass window in the church records the date of his death.
Mr MacAndrew was a well-known conchologist, a collector of mollusc shells. After his death his wife sold his large collection and raised a total of £1,400 for the activities of the Red Cross in Devon.
Mr MacAndrew died in 1915 and his widow remained until her death in 1929. The estate passed to Stephen Lee MacAndrew, James‘ heir, a solicitor in London.  At the age of sixty, he seems to have had no wish to move to Devon, and consequently put the combined Lukesland and Stowford Estate on the market.
In 1938, ground known as Lower Abbot’s Field on Exeter Road was donated to the local council for use as a recreation field by the nephew. The only stipulation was that the field had to be kept as an open place and that it be recorded in some suitable way that the field had been dedicated to the public in the memory of the late James MacAndrew of Lukesland. A tall memorial stone was placed in the field which read ‘ Ivybridge Recreation Ground this field has been dedicated to the memory of the late J.J. MacAndrew Esq J.P. of Lukesland’. Much later, in 2015, a specially carved bench in his memory was donated by the Friends of MacAndrews Field (now disbanded) and placed at the top of the field.
The recreation field was commandeered shortly afterwards and used as a military base called Uphill camp to house the arriving American troops preparing for D-Day. At the end of the hostilities the local council pressed for the de-requisitioning of the field, but this took a few years before it was eventually handed back. The concrete bases of the nissen huts had to be broken up and removed and a considerable amount of work had to be undertaken to return the field in a suitable condition for recreational sports.
MacAndrews Field happily, is still enjoyed as a place for recreation for the local community.