Boundary Stones Image

Boundary Stones

Boundary stones inscribed with the letters ‘ILB’ denoting Ivybridge Local Board can be found in various locations around the town. They marked the area of jurisdiction for the Local Board of Health, the acting sanitary authority for Ivybridge established in 1872. Originally there were a total of 10 locations where the stones were instated but sadly not all remain today, some having been lost over the years following redevelopment.

 

In 2016, Ivybridge Heritage & Archive Group successfully coordinated the retrieval of one of the missing boundary stones at Erme Playing Fields. Reported missing back in 1996, it was spotted in the river some distance away from its former position. With help from the contractors working at the recycling centre, the boundary stone was retrieved from the river and reinstated close to its original position on 31 August 2016.

 

Furthermore, our group coordinated the restoration work on two more boundary stones situated on Exeter Road, cleaning and raising them up to their original state, whilst the historic milestone a short distance away, received a fresh coat of white paint.

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Background to the Ivybridge Local Board of Health

The Public Health Act 1848 saw the introduction of an organised structure for public health across the nation. In areas which were reporting high death rates, an elected Board of Health was required but this only covered around 10 per cent of the urban population. The creation of a truly nation-wide Public Health Service did not occur until 1872 with the Public Health Act. This mapped out the country into Sanitary Districts with elected Boards of Health, bringing the supply of water, sewerage, drainage, street cleansing, paving and environmental health regulation under a single local body.

 

On 6 Jan 1873 the Ivybridge Local Board of Health declared its members. A local board of health was permitted to appoint a number of employees including a surveyor, a clerk, a treasurer and an officer of health who had to be a qualified doctor. It was compulsory for the Board to appoint an inspector of nuisances, (a sanitary inspector) to investigate complaints and take action against ‘nuisances’. These ranged from environmental public health problems such as insanitary dwellings, the accumulation of refuse and sewage, smoke, smells and other industrial emissions, polluted water, noise, adulterated food and slaughterhouse issues.

 

The local board was tasked with all the responsibilities of a sanitary district. It was also given authority to purchase land. Where necessary, these local boards were required to define the boundaries of their jurisdiction. Shortly after the creation of the Local Board, carved stones inscribed with the large letters ‘ILB’ were placed around the boundary of Ivybridge.

Longtimber Woods

The location of the first boundary stone is at Longtimber Woods between the lower path and the River Erme. It is just prior to the Council Notice Board, near Hunter’s Path.

Near Henlake Down

The second boundary stone was reported missing in 1996 but is now located on top of the bank, deep in the undergrowth.

Langham

At the junction of Kennel Lane (the footpath) and Blachford Road the third boundary stone can clearly be seen on the roadside.

Woodlands

Location number 4 is the site for 3 stones

4. Cornwood Road – opposite the western boundary of Hannahs and probably lost due to roadworks.

4.1. Woodland Road – opposite Kennel Lane but not visible.

4.2. Westlake Lane – adjacent to the entrance to the Garden Centre at Endsleigh.  This stone is currently not visible and may be lost.

Erme Playing Fields

“History raised from depths” was the headline in the local newspaper following the successful retrieval and reinstatement of a boundary stone at Erme Playing Fields.

The boundary stone was reported missing in 1996. It was for many years considered lost, until a member of our group located it, some 120 feet downstream of its original location.

Boundary Stones tab

Background to the Ivybridge Local Board of Health

The Public Health Act 1848 saw the introduction of an organised structure for public health across the nation. In areas which were reporting high death rates, an elected Board of Health was required but this only covered around 10 per cent of the urban population. The creation of a truly nation-wide Public Health Service did not occur until 1872 with the Public Health Act which mapped out the country into Sanitary Districts with elected Boards of Health, bringing the supply of water, sewerage, drainage, street cleansing, paving and environmental health regulation under a single local body.

 

On 6 Jan 1873 the Ivybridge Local Board of Health declared its members. A local board of health was permitted to appoint a number of employees including a surveyor, a clerk, a treasurer and an officer of health who had to be a qualified doctor. It was compulsory for the Board to appoint an inspector of nuisances, (a sanitary inspector) to investigate complaints and take action against ‘nuisances’. These ranged from environmental public health problems such as insanitary dwellings, the accumulation of refuse and sewage, smoke, smells and other industrial emissions, polluted water, noise, adulterated food and slaughterhouse issues.

 

The local board was tasked with all the responsibilities of a sanitary district. It was also given authority to purchase land. Where necessary, these local boards were required to define the boundaries of their jurisdiction. Shortly after the creation of the Local Board, carved stones inscribed with the large letters ‘ILB’ were placed around the boundary of Ivybridge.

Longtimber Woods

The location of the first boundary stone is at Longtimber Woods between the lower path and the River Erme. It is just prior to the Council Notice Board, near Hunter’s Path.

Near Henlake Down

The second boundary stone was reported missing in 1996 but is now located on top of the bank, deep in the undergrowth.

Langham

At the junction of Kennel Lane (the footpath) and Blachford Road the third boundary stone can clearly be seen on the roadside.

Woodlands

Location number 4 is the site for 3 stones

4. Cornwood Road – opposite the western boundary of Hannahs and probably lost due to roadworks.

4.1. Woodland Road – opposite Kennel Lane but not visible.

4.2. Westlake Lane – adjacent to the entrance to the Garden Centre at Endsleigh.  This stone is currently not visible and may be lost.

Erme Playing Fields

“History raised from depths” was the headline in the local newspaper following the successful retrieval and reinstatement of a boundary stone at Erme Playing Fields.

The boundary stone was reported missing in 1996. It was for many years considered lost, until a member of our group located it, some 120 feet downstream of its original location.

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Ermington Road

The sixth location is on Ermington Road, just south of the entrance to the playing field and tennis courts. It is assumed that this stone is now lost.

Godwell Lane

The seventh location is on Godwell Lane – adjacent to the stream between the A38 embankment and the veterinary surgery. This stone maybe have been lost during the construction of the A38.

Godwell

Godwell Lane is also the location of the eighth boundary stone. It is partially let into the stone bank on the east of the lane.

Exeter Road

Located on Exeter Road are the last two boundary stones. One is alongside the wall of Rue St Pierre, whilst the second is located a little further down the road towards the town.

Lifted boundary stones

Both of these boundary stones were successfully lifted and cleaned on 16th August 2016 by DCC Ivybridge Neighbourhood Team.

Boundary Stones tab

Ermington Road

The sixth location is on Ermington Road, just south of the entrance to the playing field and tennis courts. It is assumed that this stone is now lost.

Godwell Lane

The seventh location is on Godwell Lane – adjacent to the stream between the A38 embankment and the veterinary surgery. This stone maybe have been lost during the construction of the A38.

Godwell

Godwell Lane is also the location of the eighth boundary stone. It is partially let into the stone bank on the east of the lane.

Exeter Road

Located on Exeter Road are the last two boundary stones. One is alongside the wall of Rue St Pierre, whilst the second is located a little further down the road towards the town.

Lifted boundary stones

Both of these boundary stones were successfully lifted and cleaned on 16th August 2016 by DCC Ivybridge Neighbourhood Team.

Beatingthebounds

Beating the Bounds

 is an old custom of walking around the parish boundary. The ceremony dates back hundreds of years, from a time when ecclesiastical parishes set different taxation rates and it could make a lot of difference which parish you lived in. Participants would carry long sticks to hit the ground and the boundary markers along the way.

In 1992, the Community Council of Devon sent out a challenge to all the inhabitants of the county to do something of lasting benefit to the community, in celebration of the 40th year of the Queen’s reign.

 

Tom Maddock, an historian and previous mayor of Ivybridge, decided to take up the challenge and introduce some ceremonial structure without incurring too much expense.

 

On 6th June 1992 many people in the village gathered in Victoria Park and joined in the jollity of ‘Beating the Bounds’ of the old parish.

 

Starting at the old Ivy Bridge the route led up Station Road, through Longtimber Woods, and then around the boundary of Ivybridge returning to the bridge with a walk down Exeter Road, a trek of some 5.7 miles.

 

This first event was followed by games and refreshments in Victoria Park after the two hour walk. The venture was extremely successful and an ancient historical custom had been established for Ivybridge.

Beatingthebounds

Beating the Bounds

 is an old custom of walking around the parish boundary. The ceremony dates back hundreds of years, from a time when ecclesiastical parishes set different taxation rates and it could make a lot of difference which parish you lived in. Participants would carry long sticks to hit the ground and the boundary markers along the way.

In 1992, the Community Council of Devon sent out a challenge to all the inhabitants of the county to do something of lasting benefit to the community, in celebration of the 40th year of the Queen’s reign.

 

Tom Maddock, an historian and previous mayor of Ivybridge, decided to take up the challenge and introduce some ceremonial structure without incurring too much expense.

 

On 6th June 1992 many people in the village gathered in Victoria Park and joined in the jollity of ‘Beating the Bounds’ of the old parish.

 

Starting at the old Ivy Bridge the route led up Station Road, through Longtimber Woods, and then around the boundary of Ivybridge returning to the bridge with a walk down Exeter Road, a trek of some 5.7 miles.

 

This first event was followed by games and refreshments in Victoria Park after the two hour walk. The venture was extremely successful and an ancient historical custom had been established for Ivybridge.

BOUNDARY STONES

Boundary stones inscribed with the letters ‘ILB’ denoting Ivybridge Local Board can be found in various locations around the town. They marked the area of jurisdiction for the Local Board of Health, the acting sanitary authority for Ivybridge established in 1872. Originally there were a total of 10 locations where the stones were instated but sadly not all remain today, some having been lost over the years following redevelopment.
In 2016, Ivybridge Heritage & Archive Group successfully coordinated the retrieval of one of the missing boundary stones at Erme Playing Fields. Reported missing back in 1996, it was spotted in the river some distance away from its former position. With help from the contractors working at the recycling centre, the boundary stone was retrieved from the river and reinstated close to its original position on 31 August 2016.
Furthermore, our group coordinated the restoration work on two more boundary stones situated on Exeter Road, cleaning and raising them up to their original state, whilst the historic milestone a short distance away, received a fresh coat of white paint.

Background to the Ivybridge Local Board of Health

The Public Health Act 1848 saw the introduction of an organised structure for public health across the nation. In areas which were reporting high death rates, an elected Board of Health was required but this only covered around 10 per cent of the urban population. The creation of a truly nation-wide Public Health Service did not occur until 1872 with the Public Health Act which mapped out the country into Sanitary Districts with elected Boards of Health, bringing the supply of water, sewerage, drainage, street cleansing, paving and environmental health regulation under a single local body.
On 6 Jan 1873 the Ivybridge Local Board of Health declared its members. A local board of health was permitted to appoint a number of employees including a surveyor, a clerk, a treasurer and an officer of health who had to be a qualified doctor. It was compulsory for the Board to appoint an inspector of nuisances, (a sanitary inspector) to investigate complaints and take action against ‘nuisances’. These ranged from environmental public health problems such as insanitary dwellings, the accumulation of refuse and sewage, smoke, smells and other industrial emissions, polluted water, noise, adulterated food and slaughterhouse issues.
The local board was tasked with all the responsibilities of a sanitary district. It was also given authority to purchase land. Where necessary, these local boards were required to define the boundaries of their jurisdiction. Shortly after the creation of the Local Board, carved stones inscribed with the large letters ‘ILB’ were placed around the boundary of Ivybridge.

LONGTIMBER WOODS

The location of the first boundary stone is at Longtimber Woods between the lower path and the River Erme. It is just prior to the Council Notice Board, near Hunter’s Path.

NEAR HENLAKE DOWN

The second boundary stone was reported missing in 1996 but is now located on top of the bank, deep in the undergrowth.

LANGHAM

At the junction of Kennel Lane (the footpath) and Blachford Road the third boundary stone can clearly be seen on the roadside.

WOODLANDS

There were 3 stones sited in this fourth area, the first is on Cornwood Road, opposite the western boundary of Hannahs and probably lost due to roadworks. The second is on Woodland Road, opposite Kennel Lane but not visible. and the third, on Westlake Lane, adjacent to the entrance to the Garden Centre at Endsleigh.  This latter stone is currently not visible and may be lost.

ERME PLAYING FIELD

The boundary stone was reported missing in 1996. It was for many years considered lost, until a member of our group located it, some 120 feet downstream of its original location. After its successful retrieval it was re-instated on Wednesday August 31st 2016.

ERMINGTON ROAD

The sixth location is on Ermington Road, just south of the entrance to the playing field and tennis courts. It is assumed that this stone is now lost.

GODWELL LANE

The seventh location is on Godwell Lane adjacent to the stream between the A38 embankment and the veterinary surgery. This stone maybe have been lost during the construction of the A38.

GODWELL

Godwell Lane is also the location of the eighth boundary stone. It is partially let into the stone bank on the east of the lane.

EXETER ROAD

Located on Exeter Road are the last two boundary stones. One is alongside the wall of Rue St Pierre, whilst the second is located a little further down the road towards the town.
Both of these boundary stones were successfully lifted and cleaned on 16th August 2016 by DCC Ivybridge Neighbourhood Team.
Boundary Stone and sticks

BEATING THE BOUNDS

“Beating the Bounds”, is an old custom of walking around the parish boundary. The ceremony dates back hundreds of years, from a time when ecclesiastical parishes set different taxation rates and it could make a lot of difference which parish you lived in. Participants would carry long sticks to hit the ground and the boundary markers along the way.
In 1992, the Community Council of Devon sent out a challenge to all the inhabitants of the county to do something of lasting benefit to the community, in celebration of the 40th year of the Queen’s reign.
Tom Maddock, an historian and previous mayor of Ivybridge, decided to take up the challenge and introduce some ceremonial structure without incurring too much expense.
On 6th June 1992 many people in the village gathered in Victoria Park and joined in the jollity of ‘Beating the Bounds’ of the old parish.
Starting at the old Ivy Bridge the route led up Station Road, through Longtimber Woods, and then around the boundary of Ivybridge returning to the bridge with a walk down Exeter Road, a trek of some 5.7 miles.
This first event was followed by games and refreshments in Victoria Park after the two hour walk. The venture was extremely successful and an ancient historical custom had been established for Ivybridge.