Welcome to Ivybridge Uncovered

A Mill Town Heritage

The Ivybridge Heritage & Archives Group aims to celebrate the rich history of Ivybridge and is dedicated to promoting a lively interest in the Town’s background and development by researching, collecting and preserving archives and photographic records of this unique Mill Town.

Browseourarchives
Sept1

The Ivybridge Heritage & Archives Group aims to celebrate the rich history of Ivybridge and is dedicated to promoting a lively interest in the Town’s background and development by researching, collecting and preserving archives and photographic records of this unique Mill Town.

Oct29

Ivybridge Police Station

was originally located at 4 Highland Street. At this time the building served both as a home for the village constable and his family and from 1876 as a lock-up, when two cells with barred windows were added.

 

Village lock-ups were used for the temporary detention of local miscreants and the confinement of drunks, who once sober, were released. They were also used to hold individuals being brought before the local magistrate or Justice of the Peace.

Ivybridge Police Station

was originally located at 4 Highland Street. At this time the building served both as a home for the village constable and his family and from 1876 as a lock-up, when two cells with barred windows were added.

 

Village lock-ups were used for the temporary detention of local miscreants and the confinement of drunks, who once sober, were released. They were also used to hold individuals being brought before the local magistrate or Justice of the Peace.

Prisoner makes a break for freedom at Ivybridge

Alfred Pederick, 32, labourer, was indicted for breaking out from the Police Station at Ivybridge on the 17th January.

 

Evidence was given to the effect that on the 7th January accused was seen riding a horse in the village of Ugborough. He was so drunk that the police had to get a conveyance to take him to the police station at Ivybridge. He was lodged in the cell, but soon got out of it, and it was suggested that he effected his escape by breaking open the door of the ration trap. He got out into the garden, where he put on his boots, but Mrs. Tooze, wife of the policeman – the latter being absent at the time – managed to detain him until she could call the assistance of a Mr. Whister, who prevented the prisoner from getting further away.

Prisoner makes a break for freedom at Ivybridge

Alfred Pederick, 32, labourer, was indicted for breaking out from the Police Station at Ivybridge on the 17th January.

 

Evidence was given to the effect that on the 7th January accused was seen riding a horse in the village of Ugborough. He was so drunk that the police had to get a conveyance to take him to the police station at Ivybridge. He was lodged in the cell, but soon got out of it, and it was suggested that he effected his escape by breaking open the door of the ration trap. He got out into the garden, where he put on his boots, but Mrs. Tooze, wife of the policeman – the latter being absent at the time – managed to detain him until she could call the assistance of a Mr. Whister, who prevented the prisoner from getting further away.

The accused cross-examined the witness at some length, some of his questions causing considerable amusement.

Asked why the constable took him to the lock-up in a trap the witness replied “because you were too drunk to walk.”

His Lordship: I suppose that was why he was riding a horse – (laughter).

Addressing the jury, prisoner said he did not remember breaking out of the cell, and he did not believe that he did so.

The jury, after retiring, conveyed to the Court, through their foreman, the following verdict:- “The jury are unanimous that the door was left open, and that the prisoner walked out.”

The Judge: That means guilty on the second count.

The Clerk of Assize: You say that he escaped from lawful custody without breaking the prison.

The Foreman: Yes.

The Clerk of Assize: That will be guilty on the second count.

Oct7

The accused cross-examined the witness at some length, some of his questions causing considerable amusement.

Asked why the constable took him to the lock-up in a trap the witness replied “because you were too drunk to walk.”

His Lordship: I suppose that was why he was riding a horse – (laughter).

Addressing the jury, prisoner said he did not remember breaking out of the cell, and he did not believe that he did so.

The jury, after retiring, conveyed to the Court, through their foreman, the following verdict:- “The jury are unanimous that the door was left open, and that the prisoner walked out.”

The Judge: That means guilty on the second count.

The Clerk of Assize: You say that he escaped from lawful custody without breaking the prison.

The Foreman: Yes.

The Clerk of Assize: That will be guilty on the second count.

His Lordship: Well, Frederick, you are guilty of walking out of prison, which, of course, is a very improper thing to do – (suppressed laughter). But I think what you have done will probably lead to it being made impossible for the thing to be repeated at Ivybridge. You have been punished for being drunk whilst in charge of a horse. You have served in the Navy, and suffered from sunstroke, and probably that has led to your doing things which you would not otherwise do. I must attribute it to sunstroke, that when in prison you walked out again – (laughter). You will be sentenced to two days’ imprisonment, which means that you will discharged.

 

The Judge complimented Mrs. Tooze on her conduct in preventing the prisoner from getting away altogether.

 

Western Times 04 February 1907

His Lordship: Well, Frederick, you are guilty of walking out of prison, which, of course, is a very improper thing to do – (suppressed laughter). But I think what you have done will probably lead to it being made impossible for the thing to be repeated at Ivybridge. You have been punished for being drunk whilst in charge of a horse. You have served in the Navy, and suffered from sunstroke, and probably that has led to your doing things which you would not otherwise do. I must attribute it to sunstroke, that when in prison you walked out again – (laughter). You will be sentenced to two days’ imprisonment, which means that you will discharged.

 

The Judge complimented Mrs. Tooze on her conduct in preventing the prisoner from getting away altogether.

 

Western Times 04 February 1907

Alfred Pederick had been fined 10s. and 7s. 6d. costs for being drunk whilst in charge of his horse by Justice of the Peace, Mr. J. J. McAndrew in January.

 

Mrs Tooze who lived at the police station with her husband, PC John Tooze and their two children, claimed that whilst she went to get the defendant a drink on the day in question, Pederick forced his way out of the prison cell. Whilst trying to escape via the back garden he was stopped by William Whister, a groom employed at Highlands who returned him to the cell.

Alfred Pederick had been fined 10s. and 7s. 6d. costs for being drunk whilst in charge of his horse by Justice of the Peace, Mr. J. J. McAndrew in January.

 

Mrs Tooze who lived at the police station with her husband, PC John Tooze and their two children, claimed that whilst she went to get the defendant a drink on the day in question, Pederick forced his way out of the prison cell. Whilst trying to escape via the back garden he was stopped by William Whister, a groom employed at Highlands who returned him to the cell.

The humble bramble
Devil's fruit?

The popular Devon pastime of blackberry picking goes back thousands of years but according to folklore, blackberries should not be picked after old Michaelmas Day as this is the day when the Devil was cast out of heaven and he landed in a bramble bush and sullied it, causing blackberries to become unpalatable after 10 October.

 

Brambles were once planted around graves to stop sheep grazing, but superstition might suggest it was introduced for the purpose of keeping the dead in!

The humble bramble
Devil's fruit?

The popular Devon pastime of blackberry picking goes back thousands of years but according to folklore, blackberries should not be picked after old Michaelmas Day as this is the day when the Devil was cast out of heaven and he landed in a bramble bush and sullied it, causing blackberries to become unpalatable after 10 October.

 

Brambles were once planted around graves to stop sheep grazing, but superstition might suggest it was introduced for the purpose of keeping the dead in!

Ivybridge left in the dark

The inhabitants of Ivybridge are in sore plight just at present over their public lighting … a grave responsibility rests on the Local Board for leaving the place in utter darkness. Whether the action of a section of that body, in dispensing with gas in favour of oil lamps is wise or not, the future will show; but light of some sort should have been provided before the dark evenings set in. That the public lighting of Ivybridge has been notoriously bad for the past year or two there are no two opinions. The oil lamps in use compare very favourably with the gas lights; but that the matter should have been delayed so long reflects no credit on the responsible body.

 

Western Morning News 14 September 1893

 

Image: Billy Fry, the Ivybridge lamp lighter

Oct37

Ivybridge left in the dark

The inhabitants of Ivybridge are in sore plight just at present over their public lighting … a grave responsibility rests on the Local Board for leaving the place in utter darkness. Whether the action of a section of that body, in dispensing with gas in favour of oil lamps is wise or not, the future will show; but light of some sort should have been provided before the dark evenings set in.

That the public lighting of Ivybridge has been notoriously bad for the past year or two there are no two opinions. The oil lamps in use compare very favourably with the gas lights; but that the matter should have been delayed so long reflects no credit on the responsible body.

 

Western Morning News 14 September 1893

 

Image: Billy Fry, the Ivybridge lamp lighter

Ivybridge left in the dark

The inhabitants of Ivybridge are in sore plight just at present over their public lighting … a grave responsibility rests on the Local Board for leaving the place in utter darkness. Whether the action of a section of that body, in dispensing with gas in favour of oil lamps is wise or not, the future will show; but light of some sort should have been provided before the dark evenings set in.

That the public lighting of Ivybridge has been notoriously bad for the past year or two there are no two opinions. The oil lamps in use compare very favourably with the gas lights; but that the matter should have been delayed so long reflects no credit on the responsible body.

 

Western Morning News 14 September 1893

 

Image: Billy Fry, the Ivybridge lamp lighter

The Ivybridge Local Board at the time were very unpopular in reverting back to oil lamps and awarding a contract to Messrs. Cowdy for the maintenance of the oil street lamps. Many ratepayers were of the opinion that the oil lamps did not provide the ‘35 candle’ brightness they were suppose to offer. Thankfully, electric street lighting was too far away so the inhabitants did not have to endure the situation for very long.

Gas lamps

William Murdoch, an engineer working for Midlands based Boulton and Watt, was the first man to exploit the flammability of coal gas for the application of lighting. In the early 1790s, whilst overseeing the use of his company’s steam engines in tin mining in Cornwall, Murdoch began experimenting with coal gas and lit his own house in Redruth. By 1798 coal gas was being used to illuminate the company’s foundry in Birmingham. Samuel Clegg, an employee at the foundry saw the potential of this new form of lighting and left his job to create his own gas lighting business, the Gas Lighting and Coke Company. Street lights using coal gas dispensed with the need to fill lamps with oil and trim the wicks. Lighting maintenance became considerably cheaper and this form of lighting gradually spread further afield.

The Ivybridge Local Board at the time were very unpopular in reverting back to oil lamps and awarding a contract to Messrs. Cowdy for the maintenance of the oil street lamps. Many ratepayers were of the opinion that the oil lamps did not provide the ‘35 candle’ brightness they were suppose to offer. Thankfully, electric street lighting was too far away so the inhabitants did not have to endure the situation for very long.

Gas lamps

William Murdoch, an engineer working for Midlands based Boulton and Watt, was the first man to exploit the flammability of coal gas for the application of lighting. In the early 1790s, whilst overseeing the use of his company’s steam engines in tin mining in Cornwall, Murdoch began experimenting with coal gas and lit his own house in Redruth. By 1798 coal gas was being used to illuminate the company’s foundry in Birmingham. Samuel Clegg, an employee at the foundry saw the potential of this new form of lighting and left his job to create his own gas lighting business, the Gas Lighting and Coke Company. Street lights using coal gas dispensed with the need to fill lamps with oil and trim the wicks. Lighting maintenance became considerably cheaper and this form of lighting gradually spread further afield.

Shops in Ivybridge

Visitors to Fore Street in Victorian times would be greeted by a plethora of small traditional shops ranging from butchers, bakers, grocers and hardware stores. Also, reflecting a dependence on horses, saddle and harness makers and indeed blacksmiths.

The shops would often have large bay windows incorporating several small panes. These windows would be dressed with elaborate displays of shopkeeper’s wares, all to entice the prospective customer across the threshold. As glass became cheaper and techniques improved, individual panes gave way to larger single panes, allowing easier viewing and more imaginative arrangements.

Apart from Fore Street, shops were also located in Costly Street, Clare Street, Park Street, Keaton Road, Erme Road, Erme Terrace and Western Road.

Shops in Ivybridge

Visitors to Fore Street in Victorian times would be greeted by a plethora of small traditional shops ranging from butchers, bakers, grocers and hardware stores. Also, reflecting a dependence on horses, saddle and harness makers and indeed blacksmiths.

The shops would often have large bay windows incorporating several small panes. These windows would be dressed with elaborate displays of shopkeeper’s wares, all to entice the prospective customer across the threshold. As glass became cheaper and techniques improved, individual panes gave way to larger single panes, allowing easier viewing and more imaginative arrangements.

 

Apart from Fore Street, shops were also located in Costly Street, Clare Street, Park Street, Keaton Road, Erme Road, Erme Terrace and Western Road.

Shops stayed open for large parts of the day and shop assistants were required to work long hours, all for a meagre wage. However, during the 1890s, several acts were enforced to give these employees much better working conditions. Their plight was well publicised in the newspapers.

The work of a shop assistant is not like that of an artisan, who can at the stroke of the hour lay down his tools and cease work without any detriment to that work. So long as the shop is open, customers are perfectly justified in a legal if not in a moral sense, in entering it; and so long as there are customers to be attended to, their wants must be supplied, and no reasonable assistant will object to doing so. There is in this no obstacle to any shop being closed at the proper hour, but how often does it happen that when the proper hour arrives the employer will send out the errand boy with some parcels, or forbid his closing until so-and-so, his neighbouring rival, makes a start in the same direction? And even when the shop is closed an assistant’s work is not always done. Sometimes there may be work to be done which is necessary, and cannot be left over till the morrow; but more often than not he is directed to do work which is totally unnecessary, and could be as easily, and with greater convenience, done on the morrow. It must be borne in mind, too, that shop assistants, never too well paid at the best of times, are not paid a fraction for overtime, not even thanked. If they were, one would not often see the midnight work on other nights than Saturday, and employers would find it to pay them better to treat their assistants more honestly and humanely than they do at present. It is a remarkable thing that employers, while never forgetting the exact time of opening, are liable to forget the exact time of closing. I have known employers whose watches have been some minutes forward at the break of day, but they always lost it, and more besides, by the time of closing, a result arrived at not by a natural chronometrical disorder, but by personal manipulation.

An Appeal from Ivybridge, 1892

Sir,

Kindly allow me to appeal to the tradespeople and shopkeepers of Ivybridge, to close a little earlier on Wednesdays than they do at present. For instance, why not close at the same time as they do at Plymouth? – viz, at two o’clock.

I am sure they would not lose anything by doing such a thing and it would prove to be a great benefit to us – their assistants – for everyone will admit that our lot is not one to be envied; and if they would close a little earlier it would give us a chance of getting, at least once a week, a little recreation during the coming summer months.

I do not think that even the shopkeeper that still persists in closing his establishment on Thursdays would have any objection to this scheme that would be for the benefit of his employees – Yours truly,

 

A Shop Assistant 5 April 1892  

Sept5

Charles Smallridge

was a member of a prominent family of shopkeepers in Ivybridge. He conducted his business as grocer, draper, outfitter, footwear supplier and wine and spirit merchant from his shop at 54 Fore Street

An Appeal from Ivybridge, 1892

Sir,

Kindly allow me to appeal to the tradespeople and shopkeepers of Ivybridge, to close a little earlier on Wednesdays than they do at present. For instance, why not close at the same time as they do at Plymouth? – viz, at two o’clock.

I am sure they would not lose anything by doing such a thing and it would prove to be a great benefit to us – their assistants – for everyone will admit that our lot is not one to be envied; and if they would close a little earlier it would give us a chance of getting, at least once a week, a little recreation during the coming summer months.

I do not think that even the shopkeeper that still persists in closing his establishment on Thursdays would have any objection to this scheme that would be for the benefit of his employees – Yours truly,

 

A Shop Assistant 5 April 1892  

Sept5

Charles Smallridge

was a member of a prominent family of shopkeepers in Ivybridge. He conducted his business as grocer, draper, outfitter, footwear supplier and wine and spirit merchant from his shop at 54 Fore Street

Early Closing at Ivybridge

Sir,

I hope you will not think me importunate in writing to you again on the subject of early closing at Ivybridge, seeing that only a few weeks ago you published a letter from me appealing to the shopkeepers of Ivybridge to close their establishments at two o’clock on Wednesdays. Since then the only objection that your correspondent ‘Not a Shop Assistant,’ had to the scheme has been removed, for a cricket club has been formed for the neighbourhood, and the inhabitants have taken to the idea in a manner that must be very gratifying to its promoters, and speaks well for the success of the Ivybridge Cricket Club. A piece of ground has been secured, where for the last few evenings might have been seen what was Ivybridge a rare sight – that of the energetic curate, with a willing band of co-workers, getting the ground in condition for play. Now that we have a place where we can pass away a few hours in recreation we hope we shall have the cooperation of ‘Not a Shop Assistant’ in helping us to get the shops closed at two o’clock on Wednesdays, and by doing so he will earn the thanks of that much aligned part of the community, viz., ‘counter jumpers.’

 

A Shop Assistant 11 May 1892

The Shop Hours Acts of 1892 and the Seats for Shop Assistants Act 1899 represented the first very limited steps taken towards the positive regulation of the employment of shop assistants in the United Kingdom.

The Secretary of the Early Closing Association writes to remind the public that on the first day of the present month there came into operation the provisions of the Shop Hours Act, 1892, which was the outcome of the labours of the Shop Hours Regulation Act Committee, and confirms and extends the provisions of that temporary measure. The essential clause states that: ‘No young person under 18 years of age shall be employed in or about a shop for a longer period than 74 hours, including meal-times, in any one week.’ It is further provided that: ‘In every shop in which a young person is employed , a notice shall be kept exhibited by the employer in a conspicuous place referring to the provisions of this Act, and stating the number of hours in the week during which a young person may lawfully be employed in that shop.’ And that: ‘Where any young person is employed in or about a shop contrary to the provisions of this Act, the employer shall be liable to a fine not exceeding one pound for each person so employed’.

 

Exeter and Plymouth Gazette 20 September 1892

A cricket club existed in Ivybridge before 1892 as a previous curate, the Rev. Richard Pering Cornish, was recorded as being the club secretary during the late 1850s and early 1860s but whether the club had their own ground is not known.

 

The location of the piece of ground mentioned in 1892 is currently also unknown although a cricket field is recorded at Gerston, North Filham at a slightly later period.

Image: Current Ivybridge Cricket Club at Filham Park

Rev. George Anstiss

vicar of Ivybridge 1872-1909 and cricket enthusiast.

During his time in Ivybridge George Anstiss served on the School Board and ‘there was no institution or society in the place, whether it was for cricket or football, musical, educational, or social, in which he did not take a leading part, and he always found a ready help-meet in Mrs. Anstiss, whose Girls’ Friendly Society and Mothers’ Union were a great success.’

 

His greatest achievement was in establishing the new Anglican Church and he was also instrumental in the building of the parish room close to the church, thanks largely to the generosity of John Bayly of Highlands, the landowner.

Rev. George Anstiss

vicar of Ivybridge 1872-1909 and cricket enthusiast.

During his time in Ivybridge George Anstiss served on the School Board and ‘there was no institution or society in the place, whether it was for cricket or football, musical, educational, or social, in which he did not take a leading part, and he always found a ready help-meet in Mrs. Anstiss, whose Girls’ Friendly Society and Mothers’ Union were a great success.’

 

His greatest achievement was in establishing the new Anglican Church and he was also instrumental in the building of the parish room close to the church, thanks largely to the generosity of John Bayly of Highlands, the landowner.

Blackberries

A bramble is any rough, tangled, prickly shrub but usually it refers to the common blackberry, Rubus fruticosus. It grows abundantly in all parts of the British Isles.

Foraging for blackberries is a popular pastime in Devon given the abundance of hedgerows. Blackberry pickers are best rewarded in late August, September and early October.

 

Given its hardy nature, bramble bushes can become a nuisance in gardens, sending down strong suckering roots amongst hedges and shrubs and being particularly resilient against pruning!

The blackberry bush

what a cad it is because it happens to be common! If it were an exotic, growing here and there, and only growing at all when you nursed it, made much of it, manured it, and all the rest, then we should have it in our gardens, should write monographs about it, and call it after some tremendous botanical parsonage – nay, blackberry jam might be admitted to the awful society of Mayfair. And by-and-by it would be found out what education and good treatment would do for the blackberry, The Swan’s-egg plum was only a sloe once, and the Ribbon Pippin no better than a crab apple. There would be blackberries, perhaps, bigger than the biggest mulberries, and they might even come to be worn upon ducal coronets in place of the strawberry leaf. But the poor plebeian blackberry is like the honesty and the patience and the simple courage that God has scattered so lavishly… it grows everywhere, in spite of contempt, neglect, and contumely; nobody ever gave it a lift, or sowed it, or propagated it; but when the hedge comes the blackberry vine shoots out its long stems, and sets to work to bear a banquet for the poor… To us it is in the botanical world what the sparrow is among the birds, and the house-fly among insects – our very humble friend, and so, of course, we snub it… What would be said if we descanted upon the lovely purple flush of its modest blossoms, or the emerald of its swinging shoots in May, or the berries of scarlet and jet that come in the autumn, to make the birds fat and the boys and girls late for school!

Tavistock Gazette 7 June 1872
Sept8

Blackberries

A bramble is any rough, tangled, prickly shrub but usually it refers to the common blackberry, Rubus fruticosus. It grows abundantly in all parts of the British Isles.

Foraging for blackberries is a popular pastime in Devon given the abundance of hedgerows. Blackberry pickers are best rewarded in late August, September and early October.

 

Given its hardy nature, bramble bushes can become a nuisance in gardens, sending down strong suckering roots amongst hedges and shrubs and being particularly resilient against pruning!

The blackberry bush

what a cad it is because it happens to be common! If it were an exotic, growing here and there, and only growing at all when you nursed it, made much of it, manured it, and all the rest, then we should have it in our gardens, should write monographs about it, and call it after some tremendous botanical parsonage – nay, blackberry jam might be admitted to the awful society of Mayfair. And by-and-by it would be found out what education and good treatment would do for the blackberry, The Swan’s-egg plum was only a sloe once, and the Ribbon Pippin no better than a crab apple. There would be blackberries, perhaps, bigger than the biggest mulberries, and they might even come to be worn upon ducal coronets in place of the strawberry leaf. But the poor plebeian blackberry is like the honesty and the patience and the simple courage that God has scattered so lavishly… it grows everywhere, in spite of contempt, neglect, and contumely; nobody ever gave it a lift, or sowed it, or propagated it; but when the hedge comes the blackberry vine shoots out its long stems, and sets to work to bear a banquet for the poor… To us it is in the botanical world what the sparrow is among the birds, and the house-fly among insects – our very humble friend, and so, of course, we snub it… What would be said if we descanted upon the lovely purple flush of its modest blossoms, or the emerald of its swinging shoots in May, or the berries of scarlet and jet that come in the autumn, to make the birds fat and the boys and girls late for school!

Tavistock Gazette 7 June 1872

William Phillips

ran a general ironmongery and cycle stores as well as a newsagents and hardware store during the 1910s through to the 1930s.

Before the First World War, a popular mode of transport for day trippers was the char-a-banc. Normally open topped, they incorporated a large canvas folding hood which was stowed in the back in case of rain. They were not the most comfortable of vehicles and as a consequence were not suitable for longer journeys.

 

As time went on, increasing prosperity and eventually holiday entitlement, gave families the opportunity to take separate holidays rather than group days out and this coupled with the development of buses, the popularity of the char-a-banc faded.

William Phillips

ran a general ironmongery and cycle stores as well as a newsagents and hardware store during the 1910s through to the 1930s.

Before the First World War, a popular mode of transport for day trippers was the char-a-banc. Normally open topped, they incorporated a large canvas folding hood which was stowed in the back in case of rain. They were not the most comfortable of vehicles and as a consequence were not suitable for longer journeys.

 

As time went on, increasing prosperity and eventually holiday entitlement, gave families the opportunity to take separate holidays rather than group days out and this coupled with the development of buses, the popularity of the char-a-banc faded.

A charabanc in Fore Street with the hardware shop of Albert Drake and the grocer’s shop of Alfred Edwards in the background.

Char-à-banc

In French this translates to carriage with wooden benches, a description of a vehicle which originated in France in the early 19th century.

 

In colloquial British English the word is often pronounced ‘sharra-bang’

Sept11

A charabanc in Fore Street with the hardware shop of Albert Drake and the grocer’s shop of Alfred Edwards in the background.

Char-à-banc

In French this translates to carriage with wooden benches, a description of a vehicle which originated in France in the early 19th century.

 

In colloquial British English the word is often pronounced ‘sharra-bang’

Alfred James Edwards was a successful grocer in Ivybridge running his shop at 54 Fore Street. He later became President of Plymouth and District Grocers’ Association.

 

He also served the wider community as a member of the Urban District Council and was a keen bowler becoming President of Ivybridge Bowling Club.

Sept15

Alfred James Edwards was a successful grocer in Ivybridge running his shop at 54 Fore Street. He later became President of Plymouth and District Grocers’ Association.

 

He also served the wider community as a member of the Urban District Council and was a keen bowler becoming President of Ivybridge Bowling Club.

Warning to Trippers

First cases under new by-law at Ivybridge.

The first two summonses under the new by-law prohibiting the playing of noisy instruments on charabancs passing through villages were heard at Ivybridge Police Courts yesterday.

In both cases the charge was one of playing a concertina … and the defendants in each instance pleaded ignorance of the restriction…

The Bench decided to deal leniently with these first cases and imposed a fine of 2s. 6d. On each defendant, with the hope that it would prove a warning to excursionists in the future.

 

September 1922

Ivybridge Ban on Noise

A gentleman from Paignton was fined £1 for allowing passengers in a charabanc to behave in a noisy manner by singing and shouting while passing through Ivybridge.

He wrote expressing sorrow, and stating that he was ignorant of the by-law.

 

September 1928

Warning to Trippers

First cases under new by-law at Ivybridge.

The first two summonses under the new by-law prohibiting the playing of noisy instruments on charabancs passing through villages were heard at Ivybridge Police Courts yesterday.

In both cases the charge was one of playing a concertina … and the defendants in each instance pleaded ignorance of the restriction…

The Bench decided to deal leniently with these first cases and imposed a fine of 2s. 6d. On each defendant, with the hope that it would prove a warning to excursionists in the future.

 

September 1922

Ivybridge Ban on Noise

A gentleman from Paignton was fined £1 for allowing passengers in a charabanc to behave in a noisy manner by singing and shouting while passing through Ivybridge.

He wrote expressing sorrow, and stating that he was ignorant of the by-law.

 

September 1928

The Meeting Tree

A large tree existed in the centre of Ivybridge at the turn of the twentieth century, referred to as the ‘Meeting Tree’. Located outside Island Villas it was often the place to meet when special announcements needed to be made.

 

Horace Salter, a local shopkeeper and historian recorded that he believed the tree had been felled around 1930. “No ropes were used and a team of experts did a magnificent job. They needed to be inch perfect and as the tree fell the tree’s branches brushed shops on both sides of the road.”

Horace Salter ran a Tailors and Outfitters business in Fore Street, where it was often mentioned you could buy ‘almost anything’. Horace remained in business for 48 years before retiring in 1972. He collected old photographs of Ivybridge, boasting one of the finest collections around.

Ivybridge Town Council
SHDC
Devon County Council - Copy
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