Ivybridge

took its name from ‘ye bridge which lieth over ye Erme, being much inclined to ivy’.

Sir William Pole, Devon historian.

Welcome to Ivybridge Uncovered

A Mill Town Heritage

The Ivybridge Heritage & Archives Group aims to celebrate the rich history of Ivybridge and is dedicated to promoting a lively interest in the Town’s background and development by researching, collecting and preserving archives and photographic records of this unique Mill Town.

The History of Ivybridge

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The South Devon Railway crosses the valley by a bridge and viaduct, a little to the north, and has a station … It has a post office, several neat villas, and many good lodging houses; three large and commodious inns, two paper mills, a large corn mill, several good shops, an extensive joint-stock tannery and leather manufactory, a district church, and two chapels …The enchanting scenery of the village and neighbourhood attracts numerous visitors in summer and autumn, from Plymouth, Devonport, and other places ; and the inns and lodging houses afford excellent accommodation for all ranks…

 

A description of Ivybridge from White’s Directory 1850

White’s Directories were a series of directory publications issued by William White of Sheffield from the 1820s. These directories provided historical, statistical, topographical and commercial descriptions of towns and villages, including information on population size, eminent members of the community, public buildings, magistrates and public officers, plus a wide variety of commercial information. Understandably, these directories have been invaluable to historians giving them a snap-shot in time of towns and cities throughout the British Isles.

J21.12

aims to celebrate the rich history of Ivybridge and is dedicated to promoting a lively interest in the Town’s background and development by researching, collecting and preserving archives and photographic records of this unique Mill Town.

aims to celebrate the rich history of Ivybridge and is dedicated to promoting a lively interest in the Town’s background and development by researching, collecting and preserving archives and photographic records of this unique Mill Town.

This perennial thrives on woodland floors and flowers between May to June.

Its delicate bell shaped flowers are considered to look like cups used by fairies and are also thought to bring luck in love, explaining their popularity within wedding bouquets.

It is believed that planting them in the garden it will protect the home from evil spirits.

May21.27

This perennial thrives on woodland floors and flowers between May to June.

Its delicate bell shaped flowers are considered to look like cups used by fairies and are also thought to bring luck in love, explaining their popularity within wedding bouquets.

It is believed that planting them in the garden it will protect the home from evil spirits.

The MAY-TREE

This is one of the many vernacular names for Hawthorn and as such, it is the only British plant which is named after the month in which it blooms.

When the white and pale–pink blossom of the hawthorn appears it is a sure sign that spring is turning to summer.

 

The Hawthorn has ancient associations with May Day being a pagan symbol of fertility. Its leaves and flowers were used in May Day garlands as well as appearing in the wreath of the Green Man. A ‘Jack-in-the-Green’ was once a traditional sight amongst English May Day celebrations. Covered in a conical shaped framework which was decorated with green foliage so he resembled a tree or bush, he would head the procession.

 

It was once believed that bringing hawthorn blossom into the home would be followed by illness and death. In medieval times it was said that hawthorn blossom smelled like the Great Plague!

 

The highly scented flowers of the hawthorn  grow in flat-topped clusters. Once pollinated by insects, they develop into deep-red fruits known as ‘haws’. These provide a food source for birds, in particular thrushes and waxwings.

This is one of the many vernacular names for Hawthorn and as such, it is the only British plant which is named after the month in which it blooms.

When the white and pale–pink blossom of the hawthorn appears it is a sure sign that spring is turning to summer.

 

The Hawthorn has ancient associations with May Day being a pagan symbol of fertility. Its leaves and flowers were used in May Day garlands as well as appearing in the wreath of the Green Man. A ‘Jack-in-the-Green’ was once a traditional sight amongst English May Day celebrations. Covered in a conical shaped framework which was decorated with green foliage so he resembled a tree or bush, he would head the procession.

 

It was once believed that bringing hawthorn blossom into the home would be followed by illness and death. In medieval times it was said that hawthorn blossom smelled like the Great Plague!

 

The highly scented flowers of the hawthorn  grow in flat-topped clusters. Once pollinated by insects, they develop into deep-red fruits known as ‘haws’. These provide a food source for birds, in particular thrushes and waxwings.

IVYBRIDGE

A Beauty Spot in Devonshire

Part three

From the Beacon, a low hill a little to the north of Ivybridge, a magnificent view is obtained. For miles the beautiful green valley is spread out before one, not a bare, level plain, but a well-wooded, well-watered, winding vale, with rich meadows and fruitful orchards sloping well to the sun.

The eye follows the course of the Erme as it leaves its cradle-bed in the wilds of Dartmoor, the home of many Devonshire rivers, and sees it flashing here and there like a thread of silver as it tumbles merrily through the woods, dashes below the railway viaduct and sweeps away behind the little town to hide itself among the trees which adorn its course all the way to Ermington, where the eye can follow it no further on its journey to the distant sea.

 

In this lovely valley many an ancient manor house and ivy-clad castle peep from amidst the groves of hoary trees which are one of the features of Devonshire.

Far away on a green height, the spire of Modbury Church is visible, while an opening in a crowded valley beyond reveals a stretch of sparkling azure sea away to the south. To the west, a mass of roofs, a cloud of smoke, and a silver sheet of water are Plymouth and its sand, while beyond it are the wooded heights of Mount Edgecumbe, and the blue line of the Cornish hills. To the east, the view is dominated by Ugborough Beacon, with the bare hamlet of Wrangaton on its slopes, and the little village of Ugborough with its fine old church lying in the valley below; while to the north rise tor upon tor, like a great dark swelling sea, the heights of Dartmoor, so full of grandeur and mystery.

Far away on a green height, the spire of Modbury Church is visible, while an opening in a crowded valley beyond reveals a stretch of sparkling azure sea away to the south. To the west, a mass of roofs, a cloud of smoke, and a silver sheet of water are Plymouth and its sand, while beyond it are the wooded heights of Mount Edgecumbe, and the blue line of the Cornish hills. To the east, the view is dominated by Ugborough Beacon, with the bare hamlet of Wrangaton on its slopes, and the little village of Ugborough with its fine old church lying in the valley below; while to the north rise tor upon tor, like a great dark swelling sea, the heights of Dartmoor, so full of grandeur and mystery.

Somewhat back from the village street with its pleasant garden and orchard lying well to the southern sun, stands Pound Farm, this comfortable, old-world homestead from which we have explored the beauties of Ivybridge. A large stone trough in the farmyard, in which apples were pounded gives the farm its somewhat curious name; but the cider trough is now used to water the cattle, and the orchard is let out to others. The old-fashioned, small-framed windows stand wide open, and the sweet, balmy evening air enters the long, low room.

POUND FARM 1895

It comprises, in addition to the substantial farmhouse and outbuildings, 26 acres or thereabouts of pasture, orchard, and arable land, and is well known as one of the best farms in the neighbourhood. Is close to the village and railway station, and, being within easy reach of Plymouth, is eminently suited for dairy purposes. The farm buildings are built from local sourced granite either from a nearby quarry or the river bed.

Pound Farm was historically the site of the old manorial cider pound- house and had been let out by the lords of the manor. Mrs Allday, the proprietor of the Royal Oak, a public house in Ivybridge, is recorded as renting meadows of the ‘Great Orchard’ of Ivybridge Barton in 1779 presumably producing cider for her own establishment.

The sheep dog lies asleep in the lawn, with a couple of snowy ducks in friendly proximity; tow dark-haired children in crimson frocks and clean white pinafores are driving forward a hen and her chickens from the garden into the orchard; in the great elms behind the house the rooks are cawing noisily as they wheel to and fro around their new-made nests; a scarlet-breasted robin perched on the low garden hedge close by the open window is serenading his mate. His sweet song grows loud and ever louder, till at length his pleading notes are answered, and he flies off into the leafy shrubbery to find home and happiness.

Somewhat back from the village street with its pleasant garden and orchard lying well to the southern sun, stands Pound Farm, this comfortable, old-world homestead from which we have explored the beauties of Ivybridge. A large stone trough in the farmyard, in which apples were pounded gives the farm its somewhat curious name; but the cider trough is now used to water the cattle, and the orchard is let out to others.

The old-fashioned, small-framed windows stand wide open, and the sweet, balmy evening air enters the long, low room.

POUND FARM 1895

It comprises, in addition to the substantial farmhouse and outbuildings, 26 acres or thereabouts of pasture, orchard, and arable land, and is well known as one of the best farms in the neighbourhood. Is close to the village and railway station, and, being within easy reach of Plymouth, is eminently suited for dairy purposes. The farm buildings are built from local sourced granite either from a nearby quarry or the river bed.

Pound Farm was historically the site of the old manorial cider pound- house and had been let out by the lords of the manor. Mrs Allday, the proprietor of the Royal Oak, a public house in Ivybridge, is recorded as renting meadows of the ‘Great Orchard’ of Ivybridge Barton in 1779 presumably producing cider for her own establishment.

The sheep dog lies asleep in the lawn, with a couple of snowy ducks in friendly proximity; tow dark-haired children in crimson frocks and clean white pinafores are driving forward a hen and her chickens from the garden into the orchard; in the great elms behind the house the rooks are cawing noisily as they wheel to and fro around their new-made nests; a scarlet-breasted robin perched on the low garden hedge close by the open window is serenading his mate. His sweet song grows loud and ever louder, till at length his pleading notes are answered, and he flies off into the leafy shrubbery to find home and happiness.

 

Far removed from the din and strife of cities is this Devonshire Beauty Spot. By the sparking river, in the sheltered woods, vocal with the songs of the birds and the music of the limpid stream, and away on the lovely moor amidst the rugged tors where a few stray sheep and a herd of shaggy moorland ponies are the sole inhabitants, one may worship undisturbed in Nature’s cathedral, and as Kingsley, who loved Devonshire with such passionate devotion beautifully puts it – “See God’s signet fresh on English ground.”

This article is the  third and final  part of a  visitor’s recollection of Ivybridge from 1904.

The visitor came from Tomintoul which is located  on the northern slopes of the Cairngorm Mountains, Tomintoul is the highest village in the Highlands which probably helps to explain the  writer’s clear love of nature.

The reference made in the article is of Charles Kingsley (1819 – 1875) a church priest, university professor, social reformer, historian, novelist and poet. He was a friend and correspondent with Charles Darwin, being one of the first members of the clergy to accept Darwin’s theory expressed in the Origin of Species, and seeking a reconciliation between these scientific beliefs and  Christian doctrine.

Charles Kingsley was also the uncle of the traveller and scientist Mary Kingsley.

The visitor intimates that Pound Farm derived its name from the pounding stone present in the farmyard, no doubt an explanation given to her during her vacation, possibly by the proprietors of the farm.

 

If anyone has more information on the origin of the name Pound Farm then we would love to hear from you at Ivybridge-heritage.org

Far removed from the din and strife of cities is this Devonshire Beauty Spot. By the sparking river, in the sheltered woods, vocal with the songs of the birds and the music of the limpid stream, and away on the lovely moor amidst the rugged tors where a few stray sheep and a herd of shaggy moorland ponies are the sole inhabitants, one may worship undisturbed in Nature’s cathedral, and as Kingsley, who loved Devonshire with such passionate devotion beautifully puts it – “See God’s signet fresh on English ground.”

This article is the  third and final  part of a  visitor’s recollection of Ivybridge from 1904.

The visitor came from Tomintoul which is located  on the northern slopes of the Cairngorm Mountains, Tomintoul is the highest village in the Highlands which probably helps to explain the  writer’s clear love of nature.

The reference made in the article is of Charles Kingsley (1819 – 1875) a church priest, university professor, social reformer, historian, novelist and poet. He was a friend and correspondent with Charles Darwin, being one of the first members of the clergy to accept Darwin’s theory expressed in the Origin of Species, and seeking a reconciliation between these scientific beliefs and  Christian doctrine.

Charles Kingsley was also the uncle of the traveller and scientist Mary Kingsley.

The visitor intimates that Pound Farm derived its name from the pounding stone present in the farmyard, no doubt an explanation given to her during her vacation, possibly by the proprietors of the farm.

 

If anyone has more information on the origin of the name Pound Farm then we would love to hear from you at Ivybridge-heritage.org

Have you watched the short British Pathé film entitled Postcard to Devon ?

It is a black and white film from 1946 following the delivery of a postcard sent from London to Dorothy Ford who lived at Pound Farm in Ivybridge (even though the postcard in incorrectly addressed ‘Pond Farm’!). It is a lovely nostalgic watch.

Watch it here

May21.13

The art and industry of mankind have for some centuries past been sedulously employed in procuring and propagating a variety of autumnal fruits in this country; but among them all none is of such vast importance (taken in its various general uses and pleasurable advantages) as the apple. The easy means by which it is procured, the varieties of its flavour, the aptitude of its keeping sound for many months longer than other fruits, and its applicability to the various uses of all degrees of mankind, from the cottager to the prince, proclaims it the most useful and valuable fruit which this kingdom produces.

As cider apples are relatively hard, they warrant heavy processes to extract the juice. The initial stage was historically a process called ‘pounding’.

 

The first mechanical mills were horse powered. A large heavy round stone, called a runner, was supported on its edge within a groove of a circular stone trough called a chase. The upright stone was pivoted in the centre of the trough and drawn round by a horse.

 

Small quantities of apples were placed into the chase and as the horse drew the runner round the fruit was crushed into a pulpy mass called pomace. This was then placed into a screw operated cider press to extract the juice.

 

The extracted liquor would then be left to ferment in large vats. Once the cider was ready for consumption it would be drawn off into hogsheads or barrels and either kept by the farmer for his own use or sold to a cider merchant.

As cider apples are relatively hard, they warrant heavy processes to extract the juice. The initial stage was historically a process called ‘pounding’.

The first mechanical mills were horse powered. A large heavy round stone, called a runner, was supported on its edge within a groove of a circular stone trough called a chase. The upright stone was pivoted in the centre of the trough and drawn round by a horse.

 

Small quantities of apples were placed into the chase and as the horse drew the runner round the fruit was crushed into a pulpy mass called pomace. This was then placed into a screw operated cider press to extract the juice.

 

The extracted liquor would then be left to ferment in large vats. Once the cider was ready for consumption it would be drawn off into hogsheads or barrels and either kept by the farmer for his own use or sold to a cider merchant.

The warm and sheltered valleys and pleasant hill-sides of the county of Devon are adorned with one of the most beautiful prospects in nature when in early summer the orchards are covered with the delicate pink and white blossoms of the apple trees, to be succeeded by the rich ripe and golden fruit of the autumnal months…

The Crab is the only apple indigenous to this country, as our choice fruit has come to us from the Continent. The Nonpareil was brought from France by the Jesuits in the time of Queen Mary. The red Queen Apple, a good cooking fruit, was so called in compliment to Queen Elizabeth… Pippins are so called because the trees were raised from pips and bore fruit without grafting.

Exeter and Plymouth Gazette 30 December 1892

The Cowley-bridge Crab is described as a small fruit, the juice of which is an austere cider, but by frequent rackings may be rendered  soft and pleasant

Cider Orchards

Cider has been made in Devon for centuries. It is thought that orchard cultivation arrived in England with the Romans. Then the Normans, with their great love of apples introduced new varieties of cultivated tannic and acidic apples.

 

Cider can be dry, medium or sweet in taste. Colour, taste and cloudiness depend on the type of apple used, ranging from cider apple varieties which have a high natural sugar content to a range of eating apples which are often blended. Varieties grown in Devon are ones which thrive in the local climate and soils. As a consequence, apples which are canker resistant are more prevalent.

The warm and sheltered valleys and pleasant hill-sides of the county of Devon are adorned with one of the most beautiful prospects in nature when in early summer the orchards are covered with the delicate pink and white blossoms of the apple trees, to be succeeded by the rich ripe and golden fruit of the autumnal months…

The Crab is the only apple indigenous to this country, as our choice fruit has come to us from the Continent. The Nonpareil was brought from France by the Jesuits in the time of Queen Mary. The red Queen Apple, a good cooking fruit, was so called in compliment to Queen Elizabeth… Pippins are so called because the trees were raised from pips and bore fruit without grafting.

Exeter and Plymouth Gazette 30 December 1892

The Cowley-bridge Crab is described as a small fruit, the juice of which is an austere cider, but by frequent rackings may be rendered  soft and pleasant

Cider Orchards

Cider has been made in Devon for centuries. It is thought that orchard cultivation arrived in England with the Romans. Then the Normans, with their great love of apples introduced new varieties of cultivated tannic and acidic apples.

 

Cider can be dry, medium or sweet in taste. Colour, taste and cloudiness depend on the type of apple used, ranging from cider apple varieties which have a high natural sugar content to a range of eating apples which are often blended. Varieties grown in Devon are ones which thrive in the local climate and soils. As a consequence, apples which are canker resistant are more prevalent.

Blessing the Apple Trees

In the South Hams of Devonshire, so records an article in the Gentleman’s Magazine for 1791, on the Eve of Epiphany the farmer, attended by his workmen, goes to the orchard with a large pitcher of cyder, and there, encircling one of the best bearing trees, they drink the following toast thru several times:

Here’s to thee, old apple tree,

Whence thou may’st bud and whence thou may’st blow!

And whence thou may’st bear apples enow!

Hats full! Caps full!

Bushel-bushel-sacks full!

And my pockets full too! Huzza!

This done, they return to the house, the door of which they are sure to find bolted by the females, who, be the weather what it may, are inexorable to all entreaties to open till someone has guessed at what is on the spit, which is generally some nice little thing, difficult to be hit on, and is the reward of him who first names it. The doors are then thrown open, and the lucky clodpole receives the titbit as his recompense.

Western Morning News 06 January 1932

BLESSING THE APPLE TREES

 

In the South Hams of Devonshire, so records an article in the Gentleman’s Magazine for 1791, on the Eve of Epiphany the farmer, attended by his workmen, goes to the orchard with a large pitcher of cyder, and there, encircling one of the best bearing trees, they drink the following toast thru several times:

Here’s to thee, old apple tree,

Whence thou may’st bud and whence thou may’st blow!

And whence thou may’st bear apples enow!

Hats full! Caps full!

Bushel-bushel-sacks full!

And my pockets full too! Huzza!

This done, they return to the house, the door of which they are sure to find bolted by the females, who, be the weather what it may, are inexorable to all entreaties to open till someone has guessed at what is on the spit, which is generally some nice little thing, difficult to be hit on, and is the reward of him who first names it. The doors are then thrown open, and the lucky clodpole receives the titbit as his recompense.

Western Morning News 06 January 1932

BLESSING THE APPLE TREES

 

In the South Hams of Devonshire, so records an article in the Gentleman’s Magazine for 1791, on the Eve of Epiphany the farmer, attended by his workmen, goes to the orchard with a large pitcher of cyder, and there, encircling one of the best bearing trees, they drink the following toast thru several times:

Here’s to thee, old apple tree,

Whence thou may’st bud and whence thou may’st blow!

And whence thou may’st bear apples enow!

Hats full! Caps full!

Bushel-bushel-sacks full!

And my pockets full too! Huzza!

This done, they return to the house, the door of which they are sure to find bolted by the females, who, be the weather what it may, are inexorable to all entreaties to open till someone has guessed at what is on the spit, which is generally some nice little thing, difficult to be hit on, and is the reward of him who first names it. The doors are then thrown open, and the lucky clodpole receives the titbit as his recompense.

 

Western Morning News 06 January 1932

The old custom described refers to what is termed as ‘hollowing to the apple trees’ or more commonly ‘wassailing’. The ceremony was undertaken to ensure a good crop the following autumn by scaring away the evil spirits.

 

There are two distinct variations of wassailing. House-wassailing involved a special wassail bowl which contained spiced ale with a golden apple floating on top. It was carried from house to house and accompanied with singing and merriment. The second form, generally practiced in the countryside, particularly in fruit growing regions, is where the apple trees are blessed.

 

Standing under one of the more fruitful apple trees, an address similar to the newspaper article would be recited, then each person would take a drink of  cider before throwing some against the roots of the tree. Occasionally, this ceremony was accompanied by gun fire “men would fire muskets, fowling pieces etc whilst the women, girls and boys shouted and screamed (hollering) to the tree.” As with all customs the ceremony would have varied depending on location.

The old custom described refers to what is termed as ‘hollowing to the apple trees’ or more commonly ‘wassailing’. The ceremony was undertaken to ensure a good crop the following autumn by scaring away the evil spirits.

 

There are two distinct variations of wassailing. House-wassailing involved a special wassail bowl which contained spiced ale with a golden apple floating on top. It was carried from house to house and accompanied with singing and merriment. The second form, generally practiced in the countryside, particularly in fruit growing regions, is where the apple trees are blessed.

 

Standing under one of the more fruitful apple trees, an address similar to the newspaper article would be recited, then each person would take a drink of  cider before throwing some against the roots of the tree. Occasionally, this ceremony was accompanied by gun fire “men would fire muskets, fowling pieces etc whilst the women, girls and boys shouted and screamed (hollering) to the tree.” As with all customs the ceremony would have varied depending on location.

The old custom described refers to what is termed as ‘hollowing to the apple trees’ or more commonly ‘wassailing’. The ceremony was undertaken to ensure a good crop the following autumn by scaring away the evil spirits.

 

There are two distinct variations of wassailing. House-wassailing involved a special wassail bowl which contained spiced ale with a golden apple floating on top. It was carried from house to house and accompanied with singing and merriment. The second form, generally practiced in the countryside, particularly in fruit growing regions, is where the apple trees are blessed.

 

Standing under one of the more fruitful apple trees, an address similar to the newspaper article would be recited, then each person would take a drink of  cider before throwing some against the roots of the tree. Occasionally, this ceremony was accompanied by gun fire “men would fire muskets, fowling pieces etc whilst the women, girls and boys shouted and screamed (hollering) to the tree.” As with all customs the ceremony would have varied depending on location.

At one time agricultural labourers had a daily allowance of cider, which formed part of their weekly wage.

At harvest time, after toiling in the hot sun for hours on end, the consumption of cider increased dramatically! There are reports of workers consuming around 2 gallons each per day, much to the displeasure of the temperance movement during the nineteenth century!

 

More on the harvest celebrations, or ‘Harvest Home’ as it was called, will be featured on the website in August.

NEXT MONTH

Education in Ivybridge during the nineteenth century. We review how the Elementary Education Act 1870 and the Mundella Code introduced a few years later greatly improved the learning opportunities for children.

NEXT MONTH

Education in Ivybridge during the nineteenth century. We review how the Elementary Education Act 1870 and the Mundella Code introduced a few years later greatly improved the learning opportunities for children.

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Bluebells are native to western Europe and particularly prolific in the UK. For the majority of the year bluebells remain underground as bulbs, emerging to flower from April onwards and creating incredible blue carpets in our ancient woodland, which we fondly associate with the arrival of spring.

 

Throughout the South Hams they can also be seen in the hedgerows and in fields. Woodland butterflies, bees and hoverflies all feed on their nectar, taking advantage of this early blooming flower.

 

A Spring poll held in 2015 saw bluebells come top in England as the nation’s favourite wild flower whilst Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland all voted for the primrose.

 

In the United Kingdom, the British Bluebell is a protected species under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. It is a criminal offence to uproot the wild common bluebell from land on which it naturally grows.

Bluebells are native to western Europe and particularly prolific in the UK. For the majority of the year bluebells remain underground as bulbs, emerging to flower from April onwards and creating incredible blue carpets in our ancient woodland, which we fondly associate with the arrival of spring.

 

Throughout the South Hams they can also be seen in the hedgerows and in fields. Woodland butterflies, bees and hoverflies all feed on their nectar, taking advantage of this early blooming flower.

 

A Spring poll held in 2015 saw bluebells come top in England as the nation’s favourite wild flower whilst Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland all voted for the primrose.

 

In the United Kingdom, the British Bluebell is a protected species under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981. It is a criminal offence to uproot the wild common bluebell from land on which it naturally grows.

J21.12

aims to celebrate the rich history of Ivybridge and is dedicated to promoting a lively interest in the Town’s background and development by researching, collecting and preserving archives and photographic records of this unique Mill Town.

aims to celebrate the rich history of Ivybridge and is dedicated to promoting a lively interest in the Town’s background and development by researching, collecting and preserving archives and photographic records of this unique Mill Town.

The glory of Ivybridge is its river, a thing of endless beauty and delight to the true lover of nature. Leaving the main road at the old bridge, one is at once on a woodland path, walking by the riverside amidst magnificent hollies, not the trim garden shrubs to which we are accustomed in Scotland, but mighty trees, whose overhanging branches afford a pleasant shelter from the hot spring sunshine.

 

Tall, stately pines and larches tower aloft, ivy clinging to the hoary trunks and hanging in graceful festoons from every bough. Primroses deck the steep, grassy banks, and ferns of many kinds cling to the moss-grown rocks. Sometimes close at hand, sometimes far below one, as the path ascends and descends through the fragrant wood, is the brown, dancing river, now flowing softly over a pebbly bed, now broken into foaming masses by mossy boulders, now tumbling in snowy waterfalls over some giant rock, now lying sullenly in deep, dark pools, where speckled trout are hiding.

F21.38

The glory of Ivybridge is its river, a thing of endless beauty and delight to the true lover of nature. Leaving the main road at the old bridge, one is at once on a woodland path, walking by the riverside amidst magnificent hollies, not the trim garden shrubs to which we are accustomed in Scotland, but mighty trees, whose overhanging branches afford a pleasant shelter from the hot spring sunshine.

 

Tall, stately pines and larches tower aloft, ivy clinging to the hoary trunks and hanging in graceful festoons from every bough. Primroses deck the steep, grassy banks, and ferns of many kinds cling to the moss-grown rocks. Sometimes close at hand, sometimes far below one, as the path ascends and descends through the fragrant wood, is the brown, dancing river, now flowing softly over a pebbly bed, now broken into foaming masses by mossy boulders, now tumbling in snowy waterfalls over some giant rock, now lying sullenly in deep, dark pools, where speckled trout are hiding.

 

Overhead, patches of azure sky are visible through the leafy screen; the sun is gleaming golden on the river and strewing the dripping boulders as with sparkling gems, while larks and thrushes are making joyous melody, rejoicing in the beauty of the springtime.

Overhead, patches of azure sky are visible through the leafy screen; the sun is gleaming golden on the river and strewing the dripping boulders as with sparkling gems, while larks and thrushes are making joyous melody, rejoicing in the beauty of the springtime.

 

How delightful on one of those bright, warm spring days to mount to the box seat of the Modbury coach, and behind a spanking pair of glossy bays, beside the driver with his merry horn, to canter quickly down Fore Street, the winding main thoroughfare of the little town. Near the Wesleyan Church, a gift to the town from a generous citizen, we turn southwards, and pass along the fine turnpike road between grand old woods, meadows and orchards, through the picturesque village of Ermington, till the road grows narrower and dips down into deep green lanes, their banks literally carpeted with primroses and fragrant with white and purple violets.

Overhead, patches of azure sky are visible through the leafy screen; the sun is gleaming golden on the river and strewing the dripping boulders as with sparkling gems, while larks and thrushes are making joyous melody, rejoicing in the beauty of the springtime.

How delightful on one of those bright, warm spring days to mount to the box seat of the Modbury coach, and behind a spanking pair of glossy bays, beside the driver with his merry horn, to canter quickly down Fore Street, the winding main thoroughfare of the little town. Near the Wesleyan Church, a gift to the town from a generous citizen, we turn southwards, and pass along the fine turnpike road between grand old woods, meadows and orchards, through the picturesque village of Ermington, till the road grows narrower and dips down into deep green lanes, their banks literally carpeted with primroses and fragrant with white and purple violets.

How delightful on one of those bright, warm spring days to mount to the box seat of the Modbury coach, and behind a spanking pair of glossy bays, beside the driver with his merry horn, to canter quickly down Fore Street, the winding main thoroughfare of the little town. Near the Wesleyan Church, a gift to the town from a generous citizen, we turn southwards, and pass along the fine turnpike road between grand old woods, meadows and orchards, through the picturesque village of Ermington, till the road grows narrower and dips down into deep green lanes, their banks literally carpeted with primroses and fragrant with white and purple violets.

 

Six miles from Ivybridge, we ascend a long, steep, flower decked lane known as the Vicarage Hill; but soon again find ourselves tilted forward on the coach, as we descend the steep Main Street of Modbury. A double row of houses and shops descending into a cup-like hollow, only to climb up the opposite slope, an old church with a tall spire overlooking the town, rich meadows and wooded groves sloping away in every direction – such is quaint old Modbury.

SHANKS' PONIES HAVE LOST THEIR OCCUPATION AT MODBURY

When the coach between Kingsbridge and Plymouth ceased to run there was no way of getting away from Modbury by those not fortunate enough to possess horses or vehicles, except by incurring the expense of posting or by the ponies aforesaid. Now, however, thanks to the enterprise of a certain gentleman, a covered wagonette has begun to run four days a week between Modbury and Ivybridge railway station and meets the most convenient trains. It is a smart turn out with a steady and obliging driver, and altogether ought to be a well appreciated boon to the neighbourhood.

Western Morning News 30 Sept 1885

Shanks’ pony [meaning]: used to refer to one’s own legs and the action of walking as a means of conveyance.

It would appear this wagonette was the forerunner of the Modbury & Ivybridge Omnibus Company which was established in 1887 providing a twice daily service on this same route. Interestingly, in 1904, the year of this article, a motorised bus company of the name of ‘South Hams Carriers’ also came into service.

Six miles from Ivybridge, we ascend a long, steep, flower decked lane known as the Vicarage Hill; but soon again find ourselves tilted forward on the coach, as we descend the steep Main Street of Modbury. A double row of houses and shops descending into a cup-like hollow, only to climb up the opposite slope, an old church with a tall spire overlooking the town, rich meadows and wooded groves sloping away in every direction – such is quaint old Modbury.

How pleasant the return journey on foot through the fragrant, cool, green lanes, past many a picturesque thatched old English farmhouse, with its garden bright with daffodils and wallflower, and its grassy orchard alongside. At Ermington we pause to visit the fine old church, with its curious crooked spire and magnificently carved choir screen, pulpit lectern, and pew ends, the work of the vicar’s gifted daughters. A little beyond Ermington, the dusty main road is left, and a footpath leads beside the sparkling river, through green meadows bright with buttercups and daisies, where red-brown cows are lazily feeding or standing in the clear, cool water. In front of us nestles Ivybridge, with the southern spurs of Dartmoor forming a sheltering background, the warm evening sunlight flooding the rugged Tors with wondrous beauty.

This article is the second part of a visitor’s recollection of Ivybridge from 1904.

The visitor came from Tomintoul which is located on the northern slopes of the Cairngorm Mountains. Tomintoul is the highest village in the Highlands which probably helps to explain the writer’s clear love of nature.

Six miles from Ivybridge, we ascend a long, steep, flower decked lane known as the Vicarage Hill; but soon again find ourselves tilted forward on the coach, as we descend the steep Main Street of Modbury. A double row of houses and shops descending into a cup-like hollow, only to climb up the opposite slope, an old church with a tall spire overlooking the town, rich meadows and wooded groves sloping away in every direction – such is quaint old Modbury.

How pleasant the return journey on foot through the fragrant, cool, green lanes, past many a picturesque thatched old English farmhouse, with its garden bright with daffodils and wallflower, and its grassy orchard alongside. At Ermington we pause to visit the fine old church, with its curious crooked spire and magnificently carved choir screen, pulpit lectern, and pew ends, the work of the vicar’s gifted daughters. A little beyond Ermington, the dusty main road is left, and a footpath leads beside the sparkling river, through green meadows bright with buttercups and daisies, where red-brown cows are lazily feeding or standing in the clear, cool water. In front of us nestles Ivybridge, with the southern spurs of Dartmoor forming a sheltering background, the warm evening sunlight flooding the rugged Tors with wondrous beauty.

This article is the second part of a visitor’s recollection of Ivybridge from 1904.

 

The visitor came from Tomintoul which is located on the northern slopes of the Cairngorm Mountains. Tomintoul is the highest village in the Highlands which probably helps to explain the writer’s clear love of nature.

The Ermington vicar’s gifted daughters.

Many of the wood carvings at the parish church of St Peter and St Paul in Ermington are the work of the gifted daughters of Reverend Pinwill who moved to Ermington in 1880. With the church in need of attention, Rev. Pinwill successfully raised funds for its restoration which was completed around ten years later.

 

During this time he had arranged for his daughters to receive tuition in the craft of wood carving from the workmen employed on the project. With a large family, the vicar thought that his daughters would lead happier lives if they followed professions and three of them, Mary Rashleigh, Annie Ethel and Violet Alice subsequently became renowned professional wood carvers.

The pulpit at Ermington is one of the first pieces of their woodcarving in the church and was completed in 1889 when Violet was aged just seventeen. Violet continued to produce pieces of woodcarving for the church throughout her life, her last piece was a second-world-war memorial plaque, carved when she was 71 years old.

The Ermington vicar’s gifted daughters.

Many of the wood carvings at the parish church of St Peter and St Paul in Ermington are the work of the gifted daughters of Reverend Pinwill who moved to Ermington in 1880. With the church in need of attention, Rev. Pinwill successfully raised funds for its restoration which was completed around ten years later.

Many of the wood carvings at the parish church of St Peter and St Paul in Ermington are the work of the gifted daughters of Reverend Pinwill who moved to Ermington in 1880. With the church in need of attention, Rev. Pinwill successfully raised funds for its restoration which was completed around ten years later.

 

During this time he had arranged for his daughters to receive tuition in the craft of wood carving from the workmen employed on the project. With a large family, the vicar thought that his daughters would lead happier lives if they followed professions and three of them, Mary Rashleigh, Annie Ethel and Violet Alice subsequently became renowned professional wood carvers.

 

The pulpit at Ermington is one of the first pieces of their woodcarving in the church and was completed in 1889 when Violet was aged just seventeen. Violet continued to produce pieces of woodcarving for the church throughout her life, her last piece was a second-world-war memorial plaque, carved when she was 71 years old.

 

The sisters initially used a converted stable at the vicarage in Ermington but their success eventually led them to form their own company, Rashleigh, Pinwill & Company. This name was to give the impression that it a was a business of two men  as wood carving at the time was essentially a male profession. The business was operated from a studio in Plymouth which was part of the house belonging to Miss Mary Rashleigh Pinwill. There, they employed a number of staff as well as providing tuition for the next generation of wood carvers. English oak was rarely, if ever, used for wood carving due to its tendency to crack, instead the sisters purchased oak grown in Austria or North America. They remained in partnership until 1900 when Mary married and retired from the business. Some years later Annie moved away leaving Violet to continue the business, which she did until the age of 82, with the assistance of her team of wood carvers and joiners. The work of these sisters and later company can be seen in countless churches throughout Devon, Cornwall and beyond.

The sisters initially used a converted stable at the vicarage in Ermington but their success eventually led them to form their own company, Rashleigh, Pinwill & Company. This name was to give the impression that it a was a business of two men as wood carving at the time was essentially a male profession. The business was operated from a studio in Plymouth which was part of the house belonging to Miss Mary Rashleigh Pinwill. There, they employed a number of staff as well as providing tuition for the next generation of wood carvers. English oak was rarely, if ever, used for wood carving due to its tendency to crack, instead the sisters purchased oak grown in Austria or North America. They remained in partnership until 1900 when Mary married and retired from the business. Some years later Annie moved away leaving Violet to continue the business, which she did until the age of 82, with the assistance of her team of wood carvers and joiners. The work of these sisters and later company can be seen in countless churches throughout Devon, Cornwall and beyond.

During this time he had arranged for his daughters to receive tuition in the craft of wood carving from the workmen employed on the project. With a large family, the vicar thought that his daughters would lead happier lives if they followed professions and three of them, Mary Rashleigh, Annie Ethel and Violet Alice subsequently became renowned professional wood carvers.

 

The pulpit at Ermington is one of the first pieces of their woodcarving in the church and was completed in 1889 when Violet was aged just seventeen. Violet continued to produce pieces of woodcarving for the church throughout her life, her last piece was a second-world-war memorial plaque, carved when she was 71 years old.

 

The sisters initially used a converted stable at the vicarage in Ermington but their success eventually led them to form their own company, Rashleigh, Pinwill & Company. This name was to give the impression that it a was a business of two men as wood carving at the time was essentially a male profession. The business was operated from a studio in Plymouth which was part of the house belonging to Miss Mary Rashleigh Pinwill. There, they employed a number of staff as well as providing tuition for the next generation of wood carvers. English oak was rarely, if ever, used for wood carving due to its tendency to crack, instead the sisters purchased oak grown in Austria or North America. They remained in partnership until 1900 when Mary married and retired from the business. Some years later Annie moved away leaving Violet to continue the business, which she did until the age of 82, with the assistance of her team of wood carvers and joiners. The work of these sisters and later company can be seen in countless churches throughout Devon, Cornwall and beyond.

A RARE BIRD

I was walking on the Downs above Ivybridge on Easter Monday with a friend when we saw what must be a very rare visitor to this district. It was a bird about the size of a woodpecker, its head and breast golden-brown, its wings were black and white lines, from neck to tail, very regular. Its beak was long and slender, and on its head was a long tuft of feathers ending in a small bunch. It seemed very hungry, and kept running about pushing its beak into the ground, and allowed us to approach quite close. Its flight was a series of long glides. Can any bird-loving reader tell me its name?

A newspaper article from the Western Morning News 20 April 1922

We could not find any replies to this enquiry. However, a similar sighting 50 years previously would give us the answer.

Keep scrolling down this homepage to read about the earlier sighting.

A RARE BIRD

I was walking on the Downs above Ivybridge on Easter Monday with a friend when we saw what must be a very rare visitor to this district. It was a bird about the size of a woodpecker, its head and breast golden-brown, its wings were black and white lines, from neck to tail, very regular. Its beak was long and slender, and on its head was a long tuft of feathers ending in a small bunch. It seemed very hungry, and kept running about pushing its beak into the ground, and allowed us to approach quite close. Its flight was a series of long glides. Can any bird-loving reader tell me its name?

A newspaper article from the Western Morning News 20 April 1922

We could not find any replies to this enquiry. However, a similar sighting 50 years previously would give us the answer.

Keep scrolling down this homepage to read about the earlier sighting.

Apr21.15

The terms birdwatcher and twitcher are often used interchangeably particularly within the media but any serious birdwatcher will generally take exception to being called the latter. The word ‘twitcher’ has a specific definition and there are marked differences between the two.

 

Birdwatching is pastime enjoyed by a wide range of people and entails the careful recording of birds seen, even the most common. Often, observations are noted for future reference. Such information contributes to the overall knowledge of the species such as their distribution, population and nesting habits. This information can assist with conservation policies where decreasing numbers are noted.

 

A twitcher in contrast is someone who will go to great lengths to observe rare birds which they have not previously encountered. They rely on the monitoring of bird ‘hotspots’ and the twitching community. They do not necessarily spend any length of time observing the species nor make notes relating to them.

Apr21.15

The terms birdwatcher and twitcher are often used interchangeably particularly within the media but any serious birdwatcher will generally take exception to being called the latter. The word ‘twitcher’ has a specific definition and there are marked differences between the two.

 

Birdwatching is pastime enjoyed by a wide range of people and entails the careful recording of birds seen, even the most common. Often, observations are noted for future reference. Such information contributes to the overall knowledge of the species such as their distribution, population and nesting habits. This information can assist with conservation policies where decreasing numbers are noted.

 

A twitcher in contrast is someone who will go to great lengths to observe rare birds which they have not previously encountered. They rely on the monitoring of bird ‘hotspots’ and the twitching community. They do not necessarily spend any length of time observing the species nor make notes relating to them.

Common birds in Devon…

An excerpt from a rather lengthy newspaper article from 1863. In it, the author describes many of the common birds found locally with some amusing observations !

 

Let me instance the birds common to the locality: I am visited by the bullfinch, greenfinch, goldfinch and chaffinch, and sometimes by the hawfinch. The starling calls upon me occasionally; the too clever jackdaw is at one season an unwelcome visitor; the jay makes his unmusical voice in my orchards; the missel thrush is never long absent; the song thrush and the blackbird never leave me; and the sparrow is equally constant in his attentions. The linnet is a summer visitor; the wagtail and the swallow come regularly every spring. The wren and the hedge sparrow are my unfailing friends; titmouse major and all the minor minims of that busy and inquisitive family call upon me regularly…

 

Let me enumerate my feathered friends and describe as I go on their merits and their faults. I will begin with one I regard as a benefit and a blessing to man; I rejoice to see the active, glossy, bright-eyed starling at work on lawn and fallow. I know the small snails, the wire-worm, and grub will suffer where he searches, and I wish I could engage him to work for me, but he has higher duties in the fields. He is the cleverest, handsomest, and best of our birds; hear him after his morning’s work, whistling as he sits on the topmost branch of his favourite tree, mimicking the owl, and other night birds, and you learn that he has faculties beyond a search for grubs; watch him in the breeding season, and note his busy happiness

I must digress for a moment to remark on the degree of intelligence possessed by various orders of birds. The starling is a clever fellow, and some take a hint; the bullfinch is a capable and intelligent bird; the greenfinch is self-reliant, bold, and clever; the goldfinch and chaffinch are less clever and capable than the foregoing, and perhaps amongst birds a little silly; the jackdaw is a wise bird, the jay is cunning, timid and dishonest, as many little birds know; the sparrow is crafty, bold, greedy and clever; the blackbird is silly, heedless and indiscreet in its indulgence of appetite.

 

As regards the sparrow, he is an adaptable bird and must be regarded in various aspects. The city sparrow, the country town sparrow, the farm yard sparrow, and the garden sparrow, are the same in plumage but differ very much in habit and intelligence.

 

Exeter Flying Post 11 November 1863

This beautiful bird was seen at Ivybridge one day last week. This is a very rare circumstance, but is mainly due to be attributed to the mildness of the season. British Zoology says “this bird may be readily distinguished from all others that visit these islands by its beautiful crest, which it can erect or depress at pleasure … its length is twelve inches, its breadth nineteen; the bill is black, two inches and a half long, slender, and incurvated … The crest consists of a double row of feathers, the highest about two inches long; the tips are black, their lower part of a pale orange colour. The neck is of a pale reddish brown, the breast and belly white … the lesser coverts of the wings crossed with broad bars of white and black in the form of a crescent.”

An article entitled ‘The Hoopoe in Devon’

Dartmouth & South Hams Chronicle 19 April 1872

Researching the species on the RSPB website one learns that the Hoopoe does not breed in the UK. However, as many as 100 birds can turn up in spring, most sighted singly. These are birds which are migrating north from Africa and have overshot Europe and ended up on the south coast of England. Those that go that extra mile are sure to be a welcome sight!

This beautiful bird was seen at Ivybridge one day last week. This is a very rare circumstance, but is mainly due to be attributed to the mildness of the season. British Zoology says “this bird may be readily distinguished from all others that visit these islands by its beautiful crest, which it can erect or depress at pleasure … its length is twelve inches, its breadth nineteen; the bill is black, two inches and a half long, slender, and incurvated … The crest consists of a double row of feathers, the highest about two inches long; the tips are black, their lower part of a pale orange colour. The neck is of a pale reddish brown, the breast and belly white … the lesser coverts of the wings crossed with broad bars of white and black in the form of a crescent.”

An article entitled ‘The Hoopoe in Devon’

Dartmouth & South Hams Chronicle 19 April 1872

Researching the species on the RSPB website one learns that the Hoopoe does not breed in the UK. However, as many as 100 birds can turn up in spring, most sighted singly. These are birds which are migrating north from Africa and have overshot Europe and ended up on the south coast of England. Those that go that extra mile are sure to be a welcome sight!

It would appear that many of the same issues we face today in protecting our places of natural beauty were a problem 140 years ago if this notice is anything to go by.

Apr21.22

IVYBRIDGE: HAWNS AND DENDLES

 

Lord Blachford’s woods on the Erme (Ivybridge) are open to strangers on all days in the week; those in the Yealm (Hawns and Dendles), on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, but no other days.

 

Visitors are requested to remember that in carelessly or wantonly disfiguring these woods they are not only injuring the Proprietor but interfering with the pleasure of those who follow them. They are therefore desired to abstain from breaking branches, tearing up ferns and mosses, destroying benches, throwing down walls, cutting their names on trees, leaving about paper or bones or broken bottles, and more especially from lighting fires, which is strictly prohibited, young trees and plantations having been more than once burnt by visitors. The introduction of dogs is also forbidden.

Preserving our natural woodland

It would appear that many of the same issues we face today in protecting our places of natural beauty were a problem 140 years ago if this notice is anything to go by.

Apr21.22

IVYBRIDGE: HAWNS AND DENDLES

 

Lord Blachford’s woods on the Erme (Ivybridge) are open to strangers on all days in the week; those in the Yealm (Hawns and Dendles), on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, but no other days.

 

Visitors are requested to remember that in carelessly or wantonly disfiguring these woods they are not only injuring the Proprietor but interfering with the pleasure of those who follow them. They are therefore desired to abstain from breaking branches, tearing up ferns and mosses, destroying benches, throwing down walls, cutting their names on trees, leaving about paper or bones or broken bottles, and more especially from lighting fires, which is strictly prohibited, young trees and plantations having been more than once burnt by visitors. The introduction of dogs is also forbidden.

Dendles Wood is an area of protected woodland located on the southern edge of Dartmoor just north of Cornwood. Today forming part of the Dartmoor Special Area of Conservation, the wood is also a Site of Special Scientific Interest, and 30 hectares of it has been designated a national nature reserve. Historically Dendles Wood and the adjacent Hawns Wood are sometimes known collectively as Hawns and Dendles (sometimes Awns and Dendles).

The woodlands of Hawns and Dendles were a popular destination for recreation in the late nineteenth century. Visitors were able to take the train and alight at Cornwood and then walk for around 2.5 miles passing numerous cottages ‘with tea-tables laid out under the shade of the trees’.

The valley and 50 foot waterfall were situated on private grounds but were open to the public on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of every week.

The woodlands of Hawns and Dendles were a popular destination for recreation in the late nineteenth century. Visitors were able to take the train and alight at Cornwood and then walk for around 2.5 miles passing numerous cottages ‘with tea-tables laid out under the shade of the trees’.

The valley and 50 foot waterfall were situated on private grounds but were open to the public on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of every week.

The origins of this curiously named area is documented in a publication around the time ‘The Ancient Crosses of Dartmoor’ by William Crossing. He wrote that part of the glade formerly belonged to a ‘Madame Hawns’ and the remainder to a man named Daniels. The former name having been kept while the spelling of the latter modified. Others later took the view that the word Daniels became corrupted over time to Dendles. William Crossing in another of his many books on Dartmoor ‘Gems in a Granite Setting’ describes the beauty of Hawns and Dendles at some length.

 

The woods at Ivybridge could be reached by remaining on the train for one station further along the line. Here the woods on the west side of the River Erme were always open to the public and those on the east by permission of the owner.

In spring and summer, trees, and birds, and flowers make the Erme valley a true place of recreation. An hotel and several cottages, which bear the mystic sign ‘Tea made and water boiled’ prevent the claims of the physical man from being neglected.

Smith’s Tea House

This Tea House was located in Western Road, Ivybridge. It would not be very difficult, even today, to establish its precise location given how little the properties have changed.

 

The sign displays ‘Water Boiled and Tea Made’ precisely the type of establishment described in the news article of the late nineteenth century.

Smith’s Tea House

This Tea House was located in Western Road, Ivybridge. It would not be very difficult, even today, to establish its precise location given how little the properties have changed.

 

The sign displays ‘Water Boiled and Tea Made’ precisely the type of establishment described in the news article of the late nineteenth century.

William Crossing was a local man, born in Plymouth in 1847. As a boy he acquired a fondness of Dartmoor and its antiquities from his mother. His early associations with the moor were around Sheepstor, Walkhampton and Meavy. He later went on to explore many other parts of the moor.

 

In 1872 he married Emma Witheridge, the youngest daughter of Richard Witheridge, a draper at 2 Fore Street, Ivybridge. They lived in South Brent.

 

William Crossing published several books about Dartmoor and provided a series articles on the subject to the local newspaper, the Western Morning News.

His book ‘The Ancient Crosses of Dartmoor’ provided accounts of these memorials and speculated with “interesting fashion” upon their origin and purpose. In his work ‘Pixies’ he explored the folklore of the area, whilst his ‘Hundred Years on Dartmoor’ gave a history over the previous century.

 

He is now considered one of the best authorities on Dartmoor and its antiquities, having made it the subject of his life’s work. He has even been recognised as effectively starting the popularity of the modern pursuit of letterboxing. His book ‘Guide to Dartmoor’ refers to what seems likely to have been the first letter box. It was placed at Cranmere Pool on northern Dartmoor by a local guide in 1854. In 1938 a plaque and letterbox were placed at Duck’s Pool on the southern moor in his memory.

In 1917, William Crossing and his ailing wife Emma, moved to Ivybridge to live with her elder sister Cordelia who inherited the family home at 2 Fore Street. She continued the business established by her late father Richard. William and his wife remained in Ivybridge until April 1921 when Emma was admitted into the Tavistock Institution and sadly died just two months later. William died in 1928.

 

No 2 Fore Street later came in to the possession of the Plymouth and South Devon Co-operative (the building with the awning). Whilst apparently there were discussions regarding the placement of a small plaque commemorating Crossing on the exterior wall of the building, it never actually took place.

In 1917, William Crossing and his ailing wife Emma, moved to Ivybridge to live with her elder sister Cordelia who inherited the family home at 2 Fore Street. She continued the business established by her late father Richard. William and his wife remained in Ivybridge until April 1921 when Emma was admitted into the Tavistock Institution and sadly died just two months later. William died in 1928.

 

No 2 Fore Street later came in to the possession of the Plymouth and South Devon Co-operative (the building with the awning). Whilst apparently there were discussions regarding the placement of a small plaque commemorating Crossing on the exterior wall of the building, it never actually took place.

In 1917, William Crossing and his ailing wife Emma, moved to Ivybridge to live with her elder sister Cordelia who inherited the family home at 2 Fore Street. She continued the business established by her late father Richard. William and his wife remained in Ivybridge until April 1921 when Emma was admitted into the Tavistock Institution and sadly died just two months later. William died in 1928.

 

No 2 Fore Street later came in to the possession of the Plymouth and South Devon Co-operative (the building with the awning). Whilst apparently there were discussions regarding the placement of a small plaque commemorating Crossing on the exterior wall of the building, it never actually took place.

COMING NEXT MONTH

Last part of ‘A vacation in the South Hams -1904 ‘

The visitor looks back on her stay in the South Hams describing the beauty of the area and the moors beyond. She also provides a description of Pound Farm located in the heart of Ivybridge, explaining how the farm at one time had a cider press and derived its name from this.

 

We will also take a closer look at cider orchards, cider making and some of the old ceremonies performed each year to ensure a good crop of autumn fruit, so we hope to see ‘e dreckly!

COMING NEXT MONTH

Last part of

‘A vacation in the South Hams -1904 ‘

The visitor looks back on her stay in the South Hams describing the beauty of the area and the moors beyond. She also provides a description of Pound Farm located in the heart of Ivybridge, explaining how the farm at one time had a cider press and derived its name from this.

 

We will also take a closer look at cider orchards, cider making and some of the old ceremonies performed each year to ensure a good crop of autumn fruit, so we hope to see ‘e dreckly!

Ivybridge Town Council
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Devon County Council - Copy
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