Welcome to Ivybridge Uncovered

A Mill Town Heritage

The Ivybridge Heritage & Archives Group aims to celebrate the rich history of Ivybridge and is dedicated to promoting a lively interest in the Town’s background and development by researching, collecting and preserving archives and photographic records of this unique Mill Town.

Browseourarchives
Sept1

The Ivybridge Heritage & Archives Group aims to celebrate the rich history of Ivybridge and is dedicated to promoting a lively interest in the Town’s background and development by researching, collecting and preserving archives and photographic records of this unique Mill Town.

Oct29
Aug1

The Ivybridge Heritage & Archives Group aims to celebrate the rich history of Ivybridge and is dedicated to promoting a lively interest in the Town’s background and development by researching, collecting and preserving archives and photographic records of this unique Mill Town.

Carnival procession 1887

To celebrate the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria (20 June 1887) a carnival procession proceeded from the village to Western Beacon where a bonfire was lit followed by a firework display.  Such carnival processions were nothing like the ones of today but more of a large gathering of people often dressed in their Sunday best with many holding large banners.

On 3 July 1907 to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the consecration of St. Johns Church, the Sunday-school children, along with members of the Bible classes and the Cornwood Band marched to the church with banners aloft. Following a short service they were treated to tea at the Assembly Room kindly offered by Mrs. Millbourne of the London Hotel. Afterwards races and games were held at the lawns of Stowford Lodge where the older members enjoyed dancing to ‘the enlivening strains of the Cornwood Band’. The proceedings closed with a firework display by Mr. Rutherford the churchwarden.

Image: Church fete procession 3 July 1907

Carnival procession 1887

To celebrate the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria (20 June 1887) a carnival procession proceeded from the village to Western Beacon where a bonfire was lit followed by a firework display.  Such carnival processions were nothing like the ones of today but more of a large gathering of people often dressed in their Sunday best with many holding large banners.

On 3 July 1907 to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the consecration of St. Johns Church, the Sunday-school children, along with members of the Bible classes and the Cornwood Band marched to the church with banners aloft. Following a short service they were treated to tea at the Assembly Room kindly offered by Mrs. Millbourne of the London Hotel. Afterwards races and games were held at the lawns of Stowford Lodge where the older members enjoyed dancing to ‘the enlivening strains of the Cornwood Band’. The proceedings closed with a firework display by Mr. Rutherford the churchwarden.

The Assembly Room at the London Hotel was a popular venue for events during this time probably because it was the only room of a suitable size to accommodate large numbers of people.

 

The London Hotel had several proprietors since it was established as a coaching inn by Henry Rivers during the 1780s beside the ivy bridge and alongside the main road to London.

 

Millbourne’s London Hotel was documented as having a bar and tea-rooms, 3 private sitting-rooms, billiard and large assembly rooms, 16 bedrooms, a public bar known as the London Hotel Tap, stabling for 24 horses, motor garage, lovely gardens and riverside walks.

learn more about The London Hotel >

The Assembly Room at the London Hotel was a popular venue for events during this time probably because it was the only room of a suitable size to accommodate large numbers of people.

 

The London Hotel had several proprietors since it was established as a coaching inn by Henry Rivers during the 1780s beside the ivy bridge and alongside the main road to London.

 

Millbourne’s London Hotel was documented as having a bar and tea-rooms, 3 private sitting-rooms, billiard and large assembly rooms, 16 bedrooms, a public bar known as the London Hotel Tap, stabling for 24 horses, motor garage, lovely gardens and riverside walks.

learn more about The London Hotel >
Aug5

Frederick Rutherford

served as church warden for 37 years. He was better known as the local chemist. His shop was located at 37 Fore Street where he was able to deal with any minor ailment, saving customers a visit to the doctor. His speciality was Rutherford’s Linseed, Liquorice and Aniseed Cough Cure which was sold in bottles at 1/-

Aug6

Dog Rose

Most common in the south of England in hedgerows and woodland. It flowers between May and August with fruit ripening around September and October.

 

The flowers are an important source of nectar for insects and its fruits are a food source for birds such as blackbirds, redwings and waxwings.

 

During World War II, people were encouraged to return to the art of foraging in order to supplement their rationed allocations. The Ministry of Food published several leaflets on how to find and use the “Hedgerow Harvest”. One item singled out for particular attention was the rose-hip – a valuable source of vitamin C. The national diet was at risk of a deficiency in Vitamin C due to shortages of imported oranges. Picking rose hips from wild bushes could provide the commercial companies a source of vitamin C which could be made into syrup and sold in shops.

 

Rose hips were collected locally during World War II. Mrs Helen Talbot, the chief warden, managed the collection centre in Ivybridge.

Aug6

Dog Rose

Most common in the south of England in hedgerows and woodland. It flowers between May and August with fruit ripening around September and October.

The flowers are an important source of nectar for insects and its fruits are a food source for birds such as blackbirds, redwings and waxwings.

During World War II, people were encouraged to return to the art of foraging in order to supplement their rationed allocations. The Ministry of Food published several leaflets on how to find and use the “Hedgerow Harvest”. One item singled out for particular attention was the rose-hip – a valuable source of vitamin C. The national diet was at risk of a deficiency in Vitamin C due to shortages of imported oranges. Picking rose hips from wild bushes could provide the commercial companies a source of vitamin C which could be made into syrup and sold in shops.

Rose hips were collected locally during World War II. Mrs Helen Talbot, the chief warden, managed the collection centre in Ivybridge.

Aug33

During the 1930s the Carnivals featured both a King and Queen. Floats travelled down through Fore Street, greeted by large crowds cheering and waving.

The general consensus is that this is a Coronation Parade in 1937 to celebrate the coronation of King George VI. Does anyone know different?

We believe Wilfred Love, Sub Postmaster in Ivybridge is the gentleman in the suit and possibly his brother Harry is dressed as John Bull

The general consensus is that this is a Coronation Parade in 1937 to celebrate the coronation of King George VI. Does anyone know different?

We believe Wilfred Love, Sub Postmaster in Ivybridge is the gentleman in the suit and possibly his brother Harry is dressed as John Bull

The coronation of George VI took place on 12 May 1937.

It was the first coronation to be broadcast live on radio, as well as television, although only a small number of people owned a TV at the time.

The coronation of George VI took place on 12 May 1937.

It was the first coronation to be broadcast live on radio, as well as television, although only a small number of people owned a TV at the time.

Aug12

The real hey-day for Ivybridge Carnival was during the 1980s.

Events included barrel races, waiters and waitresses races. duck races, Tug-of-War, a 6 mile Carnival Fun Run, Ivybridge Carnival Window Competition for traders, Fancy Dress competitions and pavement drawing competitions.

The barrel race consisted of rolling a beer barrel from the Imperial Inn to the White Horse, the Bridge Inn, the Fighting Cocks, the Duke of Cornwall and back to the Imperial Inn, drinking half a pint of beer in each pub!

Aug12

The real hey-day for Ivybridge Carnival was during the 1980s.

Events included barrel races, waiters and waitresses races. duck races, Tug-of-War, a 6 mile Carnival Fun Run, Ivybridge Carnival Window Competition for traders, Fancy Dress competitions and pavement drawing competitions.

The barrel race consisted of rolling a beer barrel from the Imperial Inn to the White Horse, the Bridge Inn, the Fighting Cocks, the Duke of Cornwall and back to the Imperial Inn, drinking half a pint of beer in each pub!

Aug14

On Wednesday 11 August 1999 the moon moved between the earth and the sun providing a total eclipse to the West Country and a partial eclipse to the rest of the UK.

Aug15
Aug14
Aug15

On Wednesday 11 August 1999 the moon moved between the earth and the sun providing a total eclipse to the West Country and a partial eclipse to the rest of the UK.

Delights of the South Hams Country.

Excerpts from ‘Seeing the West by car’, Western Morning News 26th & 28th July 1927

 

Leave Plymouth by Treville street and the Iron Bridge (as it is locally called), which spans the Rivers Plym and Laira at their junction with the Cattewater. Passing the grounds of Saltram, the seat of the Earls of Morley, we are already well in the country, and among the gently-undulating fields and rich woodlands, which will keep us company for many a mile.

 

Plymstock village lies just off our road to the south, but is worth a visit for its fine Perpendicular church, which contains a magnificent 13th century coloured rood screen and interesting heraldic monuments to the Harris family, who lived here for over 400 years, and who are mentioned in R.S. Hawker’s famous ballad of the Civil War.

 

Passing through Brixton, which can boast of being the ancient home of a surprising number of great Westcountry families, including the Copplestones, Drakes, Calmadys, Heles, Fortescues, Maynards, and Pollexfens, we are soon at Yealmpton, but if it be decided to take in the picturesque twin village-ports of Newton Ferrers and Noss Mayo, there is a narrow and precipitous though beautiful little road to the right 1¾ miles beyond Brixton, which crosses the Yealm by a pretty old bridge near Puslinch House.

Aug26

After seeing the picturesque Yealm Estuary return direct to Yealmpton where Sir John Crocker, Standard Bearer to Edward IV lived, he distinguished himself in suppressing Perkin Warbeck’s rebellion in 1497. His effigy and inscription are in the church, but of far greater antiquity is a stone in the churchyard bearing the mystical word ‘Goreus’ which is estimated to be 1400 years old.

After seeing the picturesque Yealm Estuary return direct to Yealmpton where Sir John Crocker, Standard Bearer to Edward IV lived, he distinguished himself in suppressing Perkin Warbeck’s rebellion in 1497. His effigy and inscription are in the church, but of far greater antiquity is a stone in the churchyard bearing the mystical word ‘Goreus’ which is estimated to be 1400 years old.

It is a good road from here to Modbury, running through some of South Devon’s most pleasant scenery. The peaceful atmosphere and quiet beauty of this countryside, now famous for a breed of cattle, suggests nothing of a stirring past. At Modbury, however, in February 1643, a Royalist Army, under Sir Ralph Hopton and Sir Nicholas Slanning, was attacked and defeated by a Parliamentary force which had marched down the road we have followed from Plymouth to meet them.

 

Here the ancient families of Champernowne and Prideaux have left graceful monuments in the church after the manner of the 15th century, although some of these date from the 13th century. Woollen serge of a texture which, it is said, would last into the third and fourth generations was formerly made at Modbury.

 

Bear to the right out of Modbury, past the scene of the battle, past Seven Stones Cross, possibly the site of an important Druid shrine, to Aveton Gifford, (locally pronounced Auton) a pleasantly situated village on the River Avon, which bears remarkable resemblance to its vis-à-vis Pont Aven, on the Normandy coast, a place as well-known to English artists and tourists as Aveton Gifford deserves to be.

 

Branch off the main road to the right outside the village, and take a pretty country road to Thurlestone, a bright up-to-date place much sought after by holidaymakers. In spite of its modern appearance, Thurlestone boasts a Norman descent, and claims, with Plymouth Hoe and the little ruined church of Stoke across the bay, to be the first place from which the Spanish Armada was sighted. The Spanish galleon St. Peter the Great was driven ashore on the rocks here, and the Thurlestone Hotel was built out of her timbers, some of which can still be seen in the modern structure. The peculiar Thyrle Rock, which stands in the bay, can hold its own with its rival, Durdle Door, near Lulworth, as the original of the rock in Turner’s well-known picture, ‘Ulysses Deriding Polyphemus’ in the National Gallery.

The road from here threads its way over hills where the air is fresh and bracing and into the valleys where ‘low leans the apple tree,’ as in an old song of Devon, to Salcombe that scarcely English beauty spot which might be a borrowed piece of Sicily. No adequate description of Salcombe can be attempted here. Rather, perhaps, should the visitor be warned against its seductive charms if we are to complete our day’s run; so leaving by the road which brought us in we must make for our next point, the old town of Kingsbridge, at the head of the estuary, where we bear to the right along the quays and reach the coast again six miles on at Torcross.

The road from here threads its way over hills where the air is fresh and bracing and into the valleys where ‘low leans the apple tree,’ as in an old song of Devon, to Salcombe that scarcely English beauty spot which might be a borrowed piece of Sicily. No adequate description of Salcombe can be attempted here. Rather, perhaps, should the visitor be warned against its seductive charms if we are to complete our day’s run; so leaving by the road which brought us in we must make for our next point, the old town of Kingsbridge, at the head of the estuary, where we bear to the right along the quays and reach the coast again six miles on at Torcross,

 

Here we turn into a remarkable three-miles stretch of road running like a ribbon between Start Bay on one side and Slapton Ley on the other. The latter is a freshwater lake, 300 acres in extent, and world-renowned for phenomenal catches of fish and record bags of waterfowl.

 

After passing the village of Strete, pause at an idyllic spot known as Blackpool, and reflect if anything could be less like its Lancashire namesake before passing on through Stoke Fleming to Dartmouth.

 

Of Dartmouth there is so much to say that the visitor must be referred to the guidebooks. It is without doubt one of our most picturesque seaside towns, and it has a great history. Looking down its ancient streets or watching the moving life of its noble river below us we can picture William the Conqueror at the head of his army marching through those same streets to embark at the quays for France in 1099, or Richard Coeur de Lion and his Crusaders, just 90 years later, following in their footsteps. Then, perhaps, we can realise the great age of the place.

 

Dartmouth will be the turning point of our trip, and making the inland road through the town, and up over the hills behind, it will be a fairly fast run over the 33 miles route back to Plymouth which takes us through Halwell and past Gara Bridge Station to California Cross, where we can avoid retracing our steps through Modbury by turning to the right and making north to Wrangaton.

 

Here is the main Exeter road, and, turning left, it is a clear run back to Plymouth through Ivybridge and Plympton.

Ivybridge is a pretty little town that has sprung up round the three stone bridges which span the River Erme, and the surrounding scenery, with its mingling of wood and water, is beautiful, but the town seems to have had a remarkable aptitude for keeping itself out of the limelight of history. (Not an opinion shared by us at Ivybridge Heritage !!) Peace should be its watchword, and though everyone who travels South Devon by road or rail knows its exquisite valley, it is only to the few who can dally there that Ivybridge shows its real charm. Turning to the right in Ivybridge, past the London Inn, and over the old stone bridge on the left, then climbing by a picturesque road, with ever-widening views, we are soon at Cornwood. This is a pleasant village on the edge of the moor, with a 13th century church, and in the neighbourhood is Fardel, the original seat of the Raleigh family before Sir Walter’s father inherited Hayes Barton.

 

From here to Plympton, through Sparkwell, passing many a picturesque country seat, and the peeps of moor and woodland are delightful. The town of Plympton (the ‘Plintona’ of Domesday-book) has the flavour of antiquity about it.

 

It has grown up around a Priory founded in 1121, on the site of a still older institution, and the Early English refectory, with Norman vaults and fifteenth century kitchens, can still be seen at Priory Mills. In the granite church can be seen the coat-of-arms of Strodes and Courtenays and their alliances, and of even greater interest is the neighbouring Church of Plympton Erle (or St. Maurice).

 

This was one of the autocratic ‘Stannary’ towns, and in 1723 Sir Joshua Reynolds was born here, his father being a master at the local grammar school. The town once possessed a portrait of the great artist, painted by himself, and now valued in thousands, but in 1832 the Corporation sold it for a paltry £150. The old castle here was built by Richard de Redvers, a great builder of Henry I’s time.

Here we turn into a remarkable three-miles stretch of road running like a ribbon between Start Bay on one side and Slapton Ley on the other. The latter is a freshwater lake, 300 acres in extent, and world-renowned for phenomenal catches of fish and record bags of waterfowl.

 

After passing the village of Strete, pause at an idyllic spot known as Blackpool, and reflect if anything could be less like its Lancashire namesake before passing on through Stoke Fleming to Dartmouth.

 

Of Dartmouth there is so much to say that the visitor must be referred to the guidebooks. It is without doubt one of our most picturesque seaside towns, and it has a great history. Looking down its ancient streets or watching the moving life of its noble river below us we can picture William the Conqueror at the head of his army marching through those same streets to embark at the quays for France in 1099, or Richard Coeur de Lion and his Crusaders, just 90 years later, following in their footsteps. Then, perhaps, we can realise the great age of the place.

 

Dartmouth will be the turning point of our trip, and making the inland road through the town, and up over the hills behind, it will be a fairly fast run over the 33 miles route back to Plymouth which takes us through Halwell and past Gara Bridge Station to California Cross, where we can avoid retracing our steps through Modbury by turning to the right and making north to Wrangaton.

 

Here is the main Exeter road, and, turning left, it is a clear run back to Plymouth through Ivybridge and Plympton.

Ivybridge is a pretty little town that has sprung up round the three stone bridges which span the River Erme, and the surrounding scenery, with its mingling of wood and water, is beautiful, but the town seems to have had a remarkable aptitude for keeping itself out of the limelight of history. (Not an opinion shared by us at Ivybridge Heritage !!) Peace should be its watchword, and though everyone who travels South Devon by road or rail knows its exquisite valley, it is only to the few who can dally there that Ivybridge shows its real charm. Turning to the right in Ivybridge, past the London Inn, and over the old stone bridge on the left, then climbing by a picturesque road, with ever-widening views, we are soon at Cornwood. This is a pleasant village on the edge of the moor, with a 13th century church, and in the neighbourhood is Fardel, the original seat of the Raleigh family before Sir Walter’s father inherited Hayes Barton.

 

From here to Plympton, through Sparkwell, passing many a picturesque country seat, and the peeps of moor and woodland are delightful. The town of Plympton (the ‘Plintona’ of Domesday-book) has the flavour of antiquity about it.

 

It has grown up around a Priory founded in 1121, on the site of a still older institution, and the Early English refectory, with Norman vaults and fifteenth century kitchens, can still be seen at Priory Mills. In the granite church can be seen the coat-of-arms of Strodes and Courtenays and their alliances, and of even greater interest is the neighbouring Church of Plympton Erle (or St. Maurice).

 

This was one of the autocratic ‘Stannary’ towns, and in 1723 Sir Joshua Reynolds was born here, his father being a master at the local grammar school. The town once possessed a portrait of the great artist, painted by himself, and now valued in thousands, but in 1832 the Corporation sold it for a paltry £150. The old castle here was built by Richard de Redvers, a great builder of Henry I’s time.

Fardel Manor

Fardel is an historic manor located halfway between Ivybridge and Cornwood and is recorded in the Domesday Book as a Saxon estate known as Ferdendelle. Tristram Risdon, an English antiquarian and topographer, and the author of Survey of the County of Devon documents that Fardel came into the Raleigh family in 1303 by the marriage of an heiress with Sir John Raleigh of Smallridge, east Devon.

 

Sir Walter Raleigh’s father lived at the house in the early 16th century. Raleigh himself is not known to have lived there, although he often visited, and the manor remained in his family until the mid 17th century, when it was sold to Walter Hele. It remained in the Hele family until 1740 when it became the property of Thomas Pearce of Bigbury. On his death it was sold to Sir Robert Palk and by him to John Spurrel Pode. It remained in this family for four generations until it was sold to Ernest Cocks in 1921.

 

A feature of the estate is an ancient chapel near the entrance to the manor house. A register records that in 1422, a licence for divine service was granted to Elizabeth Raleigh, although the building itself might be older since the lancet lights on the south wall with their deep splays appear to be of the 14th century. Elizabeth Raleigh may have ‘restored’ an earlier chapel for the use of her household. In 1422 Fardel would have employed outdoor servants such as grooms, hinds and shepherds whilst indoors, there would have been several domestics and their families.

Quote

Antique Stone

Between Fardel House and the Ivybridge road lies a field, of which tradition says some untold evil would surely follow if it were ever ploughed up; ghostly apparitions were reputed to have been seen there at night. A doggerel couplet has been handed down, a variation of which reads:-

Between this stone and Fardel Hall,

Lies as much money as the devil can haul.

The stone referred to was found forming part of a culvert over a stream crossing the Ivybridge road on its way to Fardel. This stone is considered to be as early as the fifth century and bears on its edges Ogham characters used by the Druids when communicating with one another in the presence of the uninitiated. The Fardel Stone is now in the British Museum.

Shops in Ivybridge

Visitors to Fore Street in Victorian times would be greeted by a plethora of small traditional shops ranging from butchers, bakers, grocers and hardware stores. Also, reflecting a dependence on horses, saddle and harness makers and indeed blacksmiths.

The shops would often have large bay windows incorporating several small panes. These windows would be dressed with elaborate displays of shopkeeper’s wares, all to entice the prospective customer across the threshold. As glass became cheaper and techniques improved, individual panes gave way to larger single panes, allowing easier viewing and more imaginative arrangements.

Apart from Fore Street, shops were also located in Costly Street, Clare, Street, Park Street, Keaton Road, Erme Road, Erme Terrace and Western Road.

Shops in Ivybridge

Visitors to Fore Street in Victorian times would be greeted by a plethora of small traditional shops ranging from butchers, bakers, grocers and hardware stores. Also, reflecting a dependence on horses, saddle and harness makers and indeed blacksmiths.

The shops would often have large bay windows incorporating several small panes. These windows would be dressed with elaborate displays of shopkeeper’s wares, all to entice the prospective customer across the threshold. As glass became cheaper and techniques improved, individual panes gave way to larger single panes, allowing easier viewing and more imaginative arrangements.

 

Apart from Fore Street, shops were also located in Costly Street, Clare, Street, Park Street, Keaton Road, Erme Road, Erme Terrace and Western Road.

Shops stayed open for large parts of the day and shop assistants were required to work long hours, all for a meagre wage. However, during the 1890s, several acts were enforced to give these employees much better working conditions. Their plight was well publicised in the newspapers.

The work of a shop assistant is not like that of an artisan, who can at the stroke of the hour lay down his tools and cease work without any detriment to that work. So long as the shop is open, customers are perfectly justified in a legal if not in a moral sense, in entering it; and so long as there are customers to be attended to, their wants must be supplied, and no reasonable assistant will object to doing so. There is in this no obstacle to any shop being closed at the proper hour, but how often does it happen that when the proper hour arrives the employer will send out the errand boy with some parcels, of forbid his closing until so-and-so, his neighbouring rival, makes a start in the same direction? And even when the shop is closed an assistant’s work is not always done. Sometimes there may be work to be done which is necessary, and cannot be left over till the morrow; but more often than not he is directed to do work which is totally unnecessary, and could be as easily, and with greater convenience, done on the morrow. It must be borne in mind, too, that shop assistants, never too well paid at the best of times, are not paid a fraction for overtime, not even thanked. If they were, one would not often see the midnight work on other nights than Saturday, and employers would find it to pay them better to treat their assistants more honestly and humanely than they do at present. It is a remarkable thing that employers, while never forgetting the exact time of opening, are liable to forget the exact time of closing. I have known employers whose watches have been some minutes forward at the break of day, but they always lost it, and more besides, by the time of closing, a result arrived at not by a natural chronometrical disorder, but by personal manipulation.

An Appeal from Ivybridge, 1892

Sir,

Kindly allow me to appeal to the tradespeople and shopkeepers of Ivybridge, to close a little earlier on Wednesdays than they do at present. For instance, why not close at the same time as they do at Plymouth? – viz, at two o’clock.

I am sure they would not lose anything by doing such a thing and it would prove to be a great benefit to us – their assistants – for everyone will admit that our lot is not one to be envied; and if they would close a little earlier it would give us a chance of getting, at least once a week, a little recreation during the coming summer months.

I do not think that even the shopkeeper that still persists in closing his establishment on Thursdays would have any objection to this scheme that would be for the benefit of his employees – Yours truly,

 

A Shop Assistant 5 April 1892  

Sept5

Charles Smallridge

was a member of a prominent family of shopkeepers in Ivybridge. He conducted his business as grocer, draper, outfitter, footwear supplier and wine and spirit merchant from his shop at 54 Fore Street

An Appeal from Ivybridge, 1892

Sir,

Kindly allow me to appeal to the tradespeople and shopkeepers of Ivybridge, to close a little earlier on Wednesdays than they do at present. For instance, why not close at the same time as they do at Plymouth? – viz, at two o’clock.

I am sure they would not lose anything by doing such a thing and it would prove to be a great benefit to us – their assistants – for everyone will admit that our lot is not one to be envied; and if they would close a little earlier it would give us a chance of getting, at least once a week, a little recreation during the coming summer months.

I do not think that even the shopkeeper that still persists in closing his establishment on Thursdays would have any objection to this scheme that would be for the benefit of his employees – Yours truly,

 

A Shop Assistant 5 April 1892  

Sept5

Charles Smallridge

was a member of a prominent family of shopkeepers in Ivybridge. He conducted his business as grocer, draper, outfitter, footwear supplier and wine and spirit merchant from his shop at 54 Fore Street

Early Closing at Ivybridge

Sir,

I hope you will not think me importunate in writing to you again on the subject of early closing at Ivybridge, seeing that only a few weeks ago you published a letter from me appealing to the shopkeepers of Ivybridge to close their establishments at two o’clock on Wednesdays. Since then the only objection that your correspondent ‘Not a Shop Assistant,’ had to the scheme has been removed, for a cricket club has been formed for the neighbourhood, and the inhabitants have taken to the idea in a manner that must be very gratifying to its promoters, and speaks well for the success of the Ivybridge Cricket Club. A piece of ground has been secured, where for the last few evenings might have been seen what was Ivybridge a rare sight – that of the energetic curate, with a willing band of co-workers, getting the ground in condition for play. Now that we have a place where we can pass away a few hours in recreation we hope we shall have the cooperation of ‘Not a Shop Assistant’ in helping us to get the shops closed at two o’clock on Wednesdays, and by doing so he will earn the thanks of that much aligned part of the community, viz., ‘counter jumpers.’

 

A Shop Assistant 11 May 1892

The Shop Hours Act 1892, the Shop Hours Act 1893, the Shop Hours Act 1895 and the Seats for Shop Assistants Act 1899 represented the first very limited steps taken towards the positive regulation of the employment of shop assistants in the United Kingdom.

The Secretary of the Early Closing Association writes to remind the public that on the first day of the present month there came into operation the provisions of the Shop Hours Act, 1892, which was the outcome of the labours of the Shop Hours Regulation Act Committee, and confirms and extends the provisions of that temporary measure. The essential clause states that: ‘No young person under 18 years of age shall be employed in or about a shop for a longer period than 74 hours, including meal-times, in any one week.’ It is further provided that: ‘In every shop in which a young person is employed , a notice shall be kept exhibited by the employer in a conspicuous place referring to the provisions of this Act, and stating the number of hours in the week during which a young person may lawfully be employed in that shop.’ And that: ‘Where any young person is employed in or about a shop contrary to the provisions of this Act, the employer shall be liable to a fine not exceeding one pound for each person so employed’.

 

Exeter and Plymouth Gazette 20 September 1892

A cricket club existed in Ivybridge before 1892 as a previous curate, the Rev. Richard Pering Cornish, was recorded as being the club secretary during the late 1850s and early 1860s but whether the club had their own ground is not known.

 

The location of the piece of ground mentioned in 1892 is currently also unknown although a cricket field is recorded at Gerston, North Filham at a slightly later period.

Image: Current Ivybridge Cricket Club at Filham Park

Rev. George Anstiss

vicar of Ivybridge 1872-1909 and cricket enthusiast.

During his time in Ivybridge George Anstiss served on the School Board and ‘there was no institution or society in the place, whether it was for cricket or football, musical, educational, or social, in which he did not take a leading part, and he always found a ready help-meet in Mrs. Anstiss, whose Girls’ Friendly Society and Mothers’ Union were a great success.’

His greatest achievement was in establishing the new Anglican Church and he was also instrumental in the building of the parish room close to the church, thanks largely to the generosity of John Bayly of Highlands, the landowner.

Rev. George Anstiss

vicar of Ivybridge 1872-1909 and cricket enthusiast.

During his time in Ivybridge George Anstiss served on the School Board and ‘there was no institution or society in the place, whether it was for cricket or football, musical, educational, or social, in which he did not take a leading part, and he always found a ready help-meet in Mrs. Anstiss, whose Girls’ Friendly Society and Mothers’ Union were a great success.’

 

His greatest achievement was in establishing the new Anglican Church and he was also instrumental in the building of the parish room close to the church, thanks largely to the generosity of John Bayly of Highlands, the landowner.

Blackberries

A bramble is any rough, tangled, prickly shrub but usually it refers to the common blackberry, Rubus fruticosus. It grows abundantly in all parts of the British Isles.

Sept8

Blackberries

A bramble is any rough, tangled, prickly shrub but usually it refers to the common blackberry, Rubus fruticosus. It grows abundantly in all parts of the British Isles.

Foraging for blackberries is a popular pastime in Devon given the abundance of hedgerows. Blackberry pickers are best rewarded in late August, September and early October.

 

Given its hardy nature, bramble bushes can become a nuisance in gardens, sending down strong suckering roots amongst hedges and shrubs and being particularly resilient against pruning!

Foraging for blackberries is a popular pastime in Devon given the abundance of hedgerows. Blackberry pickers are best rewarded in late August, September and early October.

 

Given its hardy nature, bramble bushes can become a nuisance in gardens, sending down strong suckering roots amongst hedges and shrubs and being particularly resilient against pruning!

William Phillips

ran a general ironmongery and cycle stores as well as a newsagents and hardware store during the 1910s through to the 1930s.

Before the First World War, a popular mode of transport for day trippers was the char-a-banc. Normally open topped, they incorporated a large canvas folding hood which was stowed in the back in case of rain. They were not the most comfortable of vehicles and as a consequence were not suitable for longer journeys.

 

As time went on, increasing prosperity and eventually holiday entitlement, gave families the opportunity to take separate holidays rather than group days out and this coupled with the development of buses, the popularity of the char-a-banc faded.

William Phillips

ran a general ironmongery and cycle stores as well as a newsagents and hardware store during the 1910s through to the 1930s.

Before the First World War, a popular mode of transport for day trippers was the char-a-banc. Normally open topped, they incorporated a large canvas folding hood which was stowed in the back in case of rain. They were not the most comfortable of vehicles and as a consequence were not suitable for longer journeys.

 

As time went on, increasing prosperity and eventually holiday entitlement, gave families the opportunity to take separate holidays rather than group days out and this coupled with the development of buses, the popularity of the char-a-banc faded.

A charabanc in Fore Street with the hardware shop of Albert Drake and the grocer’s shop of Alfred Edwards in the background.

Char-à-banc

In French this translates to carriage with wooden benches, a description of a vehicle which originated in France in the early 19th century.

 

In colloquial British English the word is often pronounced ‘sharra-bang’

Sept11

A charabanc in Fore Street with the hardware shop of Albert Drake and the grocer’s shop of Alfred Edwards in the background.

Char-à-banc

In French this translates to carriage with wooden benches, a description of a vehicle which originated in France in the early 19th century.

 

In colloquial British English the word is often pronounced ‘sharra-bang’

Alfred James Edwards was a successful grocer in Ivybridge running his shop at 54 Fore Street. He later became President of Plymouth and District Grocers’ Association.

 

He also served the wider community as a member of the Urban District Council and was a keen bowler becoming President of Ivybridge Bowling Club.

Sept15

Alfred James Edwards was a successful grocer in Ivybridge running his shop at 54 Fore Street. He later became President of Plymouth and District Grocers’ Association.

 

He also served the wider community as a member of the Urban District Council and was a keen bowler becoming President of Ivybridge Bowling Club.

Warning to Trippers

First cases under new by-law at Ivybridge.

The first two summonses under the new by-law prohibiting the playing of noisy instruments on charabancs passing through villages were heard at Ivybridge Police Courts yesterday.

In both cases the charge was one of playing a concertina … and the defendants in each instance pleaded ignorance of the restriction…

The Bench decided to deal leniently with these first cases and imposed a fine of 2s. 6d. On each defendant, with the hope that it would prove a warning to excursionists in the future.

 

September 1922

Ivybridge Ban on Noise

A gentleman from Paignton was fined £1 for allowing passengers in a charabanc to behave in a noisy manner by singing and shouting while passing through Ivybridge.

He wrote expressing sorrow, and stating that he was ignorant of the by-law.

 

September 1928

Warning to Trippers

First cases under new by-law at Ivybridge.

The first two summonses under the new by-law prohibiting the playing of noisy instruments on charabancs passing through villages were heard at Ivybridge Police Courts yesterday.

In both cases the charge was one of playing a concertina … and the defendants in each instance pleaded ignorance of the restriction…

The Bench decided to deal leniently with these first cases and imposed a fine of 2s. 6d. On each defendant, with the hope that it would prove a warning to excursionists in the future.

 

September 1922

Ivybridge Ban on Noise

A gentleman from Paignton was fined £1 for allowing passengers in a charabanc to behave in a noisy manner by singing and shouting while passing through Ivybridge.

He wrote expressing sorrow, and stating that he was ignorant of the by-law.

 

September 1928

The Meeting Tree

A large tree existed in the centre of Ivybridge at the turn of the twentieth century, referred to as the ‘Meeting Tree’. Located outside Island Villas it was often the place to meet when special announcements needed to be made.

 

Horace Salter, a local shopkeeper and historian recorded that he believed the tree had been felled around 1930. “No ropes were used and a team of experts did a magnificent job. They needed to be inch perfect and as the tree fell the tree’s branches brushed shops on both sides of the road.”

Horace Salter ran a Tailors and Outfitters business in Fore Street, where it was often mentioned you could buy ‘almost anything’. Horace remained in business for 48 years before retiring in 1972. He collected old photographs of Ivybridge, boasting one of the finest collections around.

Ivybridge Town Council
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